Nav: Home

Children need conventional CPR; black and Hispanic children more likely to get Hands-Only

November 12, 2016

NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 12, 2016 -- While compressions-only or Hands-Only CPR is as good as conventional CPR for adults, children benefit more from the conventional approach that includes rescue breaths. But black and Hispanic children are more likely to receive the compressions-only method, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.

Last year, Philadelphia researchers reported that bystander CPR on kids has increased and this year they report the comparison between conventional CPR attempts and Hands-Only attempts.

Using a large national registry in the United States, researchers examined the outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children 18 years and younger. Of 1,458 arrests treated with bystander CPR between 2013-2015, 49 percent of children received conventional CPR, 50 percent were given compressions-only CPR, and 1 percent had ventilation-only CPR. Among the findings:
  • Compressions-only CPR was used more often in black children (56 percent) and Hispanic children (64 percent) than in white children (49 percent).

  • Although black children were more likely to receive compressions-only CPR, their survival was better if they received conventional CPR.

  • Conventional CPR was associated with a 60 percent better chance of survival and a 50 percent better chance of being discharged from the hospital with good brain function.

  • Infants were more likely to receive conventional CPR, and that approach improved their survival more than compressions-only CPR.

  • Overall, survival was 17 percent for conventional CPR and 14 percent for compressions-only CPR.
The American Heart Association recommends conventional CPR (compressions and rescue breaths) for infants and children, but if rescuers are unwilling or unable to deliver breaths, they should perform compressions-only CPR.
-end-
Maryam Y. Naim, M.D., assistant professor Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine and Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and The University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine;

Note: Scientific presentation time is 3:45 p.m. CT, Sunday, Nov. 13 in Great Hall D.

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

American Heart Association

Related Cpr Articles:

Chances of receiving CPR at home decreases with age
The likelihood of a family member or friend stepping in to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a person suffering from a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) at home decreases with the victim's age, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine that also found low CPR training rates among older Americans.
Three little letters that could make you a big hero at the beach this summer: CPR
New study shows that bystander CPR is associated with favorable neurological survival for drowning victims in cardiac arrest
Women perform worse in CPR
Does it matter whether a man or a woman carries out CPR?
CPR skills low among older adults
CPR knowledge is low in many communities, especially among older adults.
CPR from bystanders associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatrics
Receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation from a bystander -- compared with not -- was associated with better overall and neurologically favorable survival for children and adolescents who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
Bystander CPR improves survival, neurological outcomes in US children
Children who suffer cardiac arrest outside a hospital setting are more likely to survive, and to have better neurological outcomes, when they receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
Frequent simulation-based training may improve CPR proficiency among hospital staff
Mobile simulation training can improve CPR proficiency among hospital personnel.
Help is just a phone call away -- telephone CPR improves cardiac arrest outcomes
University of Arizona study published in JAMA Cardiology demonstrates that it is feasible to save lives from cardiac arrest through implementing and measuring this key intervention of Telephone-CPR instructions delivered by 9-1-1 dispatchers.
Implementation of telephone CPR program results in improved cardiac arrest outcomes
Implementation of a guideline-based telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TCPR) program was associated with improvements in the timeliness of TCPR, survival to hospital discharge, and survival with favorable functional outcome for patients who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to a study published online by JAMA Cardiology.
Bystander CPR on kids has increased, survival odds improve for some
Just under half of children that had an out of hospital cardiac arrest received CPR from bystanders.

Related Cpr Reading:

Cpr & Lifesaving (Quick Study)
by Inc. BarCharts (Author)

CPR, AED & First Aid Certification Course Kit - Including Practice Tests - Detailed instructions of One- Rescuer CPR, AED & First Aid use - A Complete CPR Course available on the NHCPS website.
by Satori Continuum Publishing

Standard First Aid, CPR, and AED
by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) (Author), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) (Author), Alton L. Thygerson (Author), Steven M. Thygerson (Author)

Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED
by American Heart Association (Author)

Advanced First Aid, CPR, and AED (Orange Book)
by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) (Author), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) (Author), Alton L. Thygerson (Author), Steven M. Thygerson (Author)

BLS (Basic Life Support) Provider Manual
by American Heart Association (Author)

Heartsaver CPR AED Student Workbook 2015
by American Heart Association (Author)

Responding to Emergencies: Comprehensive First Aid/CPR/AED Textbook
by American Red Cross (Author)

Advanced First Aid, CPR, & AED
by National Safety Council (Author)

First Aid, Survival, and CPR: Home and Field Pocket Guide
by Shirley A. Jones (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Bias And Perception
How does bias distort our thinking, our listening, our beliefs... and even our search results? How can we fight it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about the unconscious biases that shape us. Guests include writer and broadcaster Yassmin Abdel-Magied, climatologist J. Marshall Shepherd, journalist Andreas Ekström, and experimental psychologist Tony Salvador.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#513 Dinosaur Tails
This week: dinosaurs! We're discussing dinosaur tails, bipedalism, paleontology public outreach, dinosaur MOOCs, and other neat dinosaur related things with Dr. Scott Persons from the University of Alberta, who is also the author of the book "Dinosaurs of the Alberta Badlands".