Sexual activity rarely a heart-stopping activity

November 12, 2017

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 12, 2017 -- Sexual activity is rarely associated with sudden cardiac arrest, a life-threatening malfunction of the heart's electrical system causing the heart to suddenly stop beating, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

To determine whether sexual activity might trigger sudden cardiac arrest, researchers examined records on 4,557 cases of cardiac arrest in adults between 2002 and 2015 in a community in the northwestern United States.

Researchers found: The presence of heart disease and the use of heart medications was common and similar in both groups.

These new data may help inform discussions between healthcare providers and patients on the safety of sexual activity. They also highlight the need to educate the public on the importance of bystander CPR for sudden cardiac arrest, irrespective of the circumstances, researchers said.
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The study was funded by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute grants to Dr Sumeet Chugh, the principal investigator.

Aapo Aro, M.D., first author, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, California. Sumeet Chugh, M.D., senior author, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, California.

Presentation Location: Population Science Section, Science and Technology Hall

Additional Resources:Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke - the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation's oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

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American Heart Association

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