COPD patients rarely receive pulmonary rehabilitation despite its health benefits

November 12, 2018

Nov 12, 2018--Only a tiny fraction of patients hospitalized for COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, participate in a pulmonary rehabilitation program following hospitalization, even though such programs are recommended and Medicare covers their cost, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

In "Participation in Pulmonary Rehabilitation Following Hospitalization for COPD among Medicare Beneficiaries," Kerry A. Spitzer, PhD, MPA, and co-authors report that in 2012 only 1.9 percent of COPD patients nationally started a pulmonary rehabilitation within six months of being hospitalized for a COPD exacerbation. This despite the fact that two years earlier Medicare's policy changed to provide coverage for pulmonary rehabilitation services, effectively offering pulmonary rehabilitation to millions of U.S. patients for the first time.

COPD is a chronic disease and the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. Pulmonary rehabilitation provides exercise training, self-management advice, nutrition counseling and emotional support. Despite its proven benefits, an ATS-commissioned survey by Wakefield Research found that 62 percent of people diagnosed with COPD have never heard of pulmonary rehabilitation.

The patient-tailored intervention has been shown to improve physical and psychological well-being and quality of life. Other studies have shown that pulmonary rehabilitation reduces COPD exacerbations that often lead to hospitalization. Clinical guidelines recommend that patients begin pulmonary rehabilitation within three weeks following discharge from the hospital.

According to study senior author Peter Lindenauer, MD, MSc, a hospitalist at Baystate Medical Center and director of the Institute for Healthcare Delivery and Population Science at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, there has been growing recognition of the benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation.

As hospitals and health systems, like ours, increase efforts to keep patients with COPD healthy and out of the hospital, we have prioritized enrolling patients into our rehabilitation program prior to hospital discharge," Dr. Lindeauer said. "As a result, we are seeing improvements in readmission rates among patients with COPD."

After reviewing the records of 223,832 patients hospitalized for COPD in 2012, the researchers found:Study limitations include the fact that researchers could not determine whether the low rates of pulmonary rehabilitation utilization were due to lack of physician referrals, patients choosing not to attend or a combination of the two factors. Dr. Spitzer, the lead study author and senior clinical research coordinator at Baystate, believes more research is needed to understand why patients are not receiving pulmonary rehabilitation.

"Unfortunately, many patients face multiple barriers to participating, such as family responsibilities or transportation, and participation rates are especially low among vulnerable populations," she said. "We have a lot learn about how hospitals can help address these challenges."
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About the Annals of the American Thoracic Society (AnnalsATS)

The AnnalsATS is a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Thoracic Society. The Journal delivers up-to-date and authoritative coverage of adult and pediatric pulmonary and respiratory sleep medicine and adult critical care. The scope of the Journal encompasses content that is applicable to clinical practice, the formative and continuing education of clinical specialists and the advancement of public health. Editor: David Lederer, MD, MS, associate professor of medicine and epidemiology and associate division chief for clinical and translational research at Columbia University.

About the American Thoracic Society

Founded in 1905, the American Thoracic Society is the world's leading medical association dedicated to advancing pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The Society's more than 16,000 members prevent and fight respiratory disease around the globe through research, education, patient care and advocacy. The ATS publishes three journals, the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology and the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

The ATS will hold its 2019 International Conference, May 17-22, in Dallas, Texas, where world-renowned experts will share the latest scientific research and clinical advances in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine.

American Thoracic Society

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