Study examined switching rates between Allegra® (fexofenadine HCl) and Claritin®

November 12, 1999

CHICAGO, Il., November 13, 1999 - A higher percentage of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) patients switched to Allegra® (fexofenadine HCl) from Claritin® (loratadine) than vice versa in the spring and fall of 1997 and 1998, according to the results of a study of more than 33,000 patients presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

The findings are based on "Prescribing Patterns of Non-sedating Antihistamines and Daily Dose Differences in a Managed Care Population," a study that evaluated the continuity of allergy treatment by drug and by allergy season (spring, fall 1997- 1998). The retrospective study analyzed data from physicians' claims from 12 United Healthcare health plans.

During the study period, an average of 12.6 percent of patients taking Claritin switched to Allegra versus 10.0 percent of patients who switched from Allegra to Claritin. "Usage data about newer therapies is important for managed care organizations to analyze so they can understand physician and patient preferences," said Lewis Roht, M.D., Director of Drug Surveillance and Epidemiology at Hoechst Marion Roussel.

Other Studies
Other data presented at the ACAAI meeting by Hoechst Marion Roussel included:
-end-
Allegra is currently indicated for seasonal allergic rhinitis in patients 12 and older. The side-effect profile of Allegra is similar to that of placebo. The most commonly reported adverse events for Allegra and placebo are cold or flu (2.5% vs. 1.5%), nausea (1.6% vs. 1.5%) and menstrual pain (1.5% vs. 0.3%).

Held in Chicago, IL the annual ACAAI meeting included academic and clinical data from leaders in the fields of allergy, asthma and immunology, and from pharmaceutical companies. Studies were presented in seminars, scientific workshops, symposia, and poster sessions.

Hoechst Marion Roussel USA is a leader in pharmaceutical-based health care, dedicated to moving beyond medicine to healthTM through the discovery and delivery of prescription drugs and the provision of value-added patient support programs. The global headquarters of Hoechst Marion Roussel is in Frankfurt, Germany, and the North American headquarters is in Kansas City, Mo.

Contacts:
Charles F. Rouse III
Hoechst Marion Roussel
816-966-4052

Suzanne Wiele
Porter Novelli
816-966-3475 or Lis Raciti Porter Novelli 212-601-8016

To receive a copy of this news release or any recent release via fax, call Hoechst Marion Roussel's automated news fax line at 800-556-7422, or 816-966-3434. See attached prescribing information or to receive prescribing information, call 800-552-3656, or 816-966-3349, or visit the Hoechst Marion Roussel U.S.A. Web site at http://www.hmri.com.

Statements in this news release other than historical information are forward-looking statements subject to risks and uncertainties. Actual results could differ materially depending on factors such as the availability of resources, the timing and effects of regulatory actions, the strength of competition, the outcome of litigation, and the effectiveness of patent protection. Additional information regarding risks and uncertainties is set forth in the Annual Report on Form 20-F and other documents of Hoechst AG on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Claritin is a registered trademark of Schering Corporation.

Porter Novelli

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