Members receive distinction as fellows of agronomy society

November 13, 2003

MADISON, WI, NOV. 13, 2003 - Thirty members of the American Society of Agronomy (ASA) have received the honor of Fellows of the American Society of Agronomy. The prestigious awards were presented at the 2003 Annual Meetings of ASA, held in conjunction with the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), and Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) from Nov. 2-6, in Denver, CO. Named as Fellows are:The Society has been selecting outstanding members to the position of Fellow since 1924. Colleagues within the Society nominate worthy members and the ASA Committee on the Nomination of Fellows carefully rank the nominees with final election made by the ASA Executive Committee. The Society has chosen 30 individuals, based on their professional achievements and meritorious service, to receive this honor in 2003.

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) www.agronomy.org, the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) www.crops.org and the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) www.soils.org are educational organizations helping their 11,000+ members advance the disciplines and practices of agronomy, crop and soil sciences by supporting professional growth and science policy initiatives, and by providing quality, research-based publications and a variety of member services.
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American Society of Agronomy

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