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Combination gene therapy more effective in cartilage preservation in osteoarthritis

November 13, 2018

New Rochelle, NY, November 13, 2018--A combinatorial gene therapy approach- one designed to inhibit inflammation and one targeting protection against cartilage degeneration - was shown to preserve articular cartilage better than each approach alone in animal models of both moderate and severe post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The therapeutic strategy included combined delivery of helper-dependent adenoviruses expressing interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) to block inflammation and PRG4 (lubricin) to promote pro-anabolic cartilage genes and decrease expression of catabolic genes, as reported in an article published in Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the Human Gene Therapy website through December 13, 2018.

The article entitled "Combinatorial Prg4 and Il-1ra Gene Therapy Protects Against Hyperalgesia and Cartilage Degeneration in Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis," was coauthored by Adrianne Stone, Matthew W. Grol, Brendan H.L. Lee, and a team of researchers from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. The researchers used two surgical techniques to model moderate and severe post-traumatic osteoarthritis. They found that the combination gene therapy led to improved cartilage preservation compared to monotherapy in both animal models.

"Osteoarthritis is one of the most prevalent potential targets for gene therapy, and its prevalence is increasing with the aging of the population," says Editor-in-Chief Terence R. Flotte, MD, Celia and Isaac Haidak Professor of Medical Education and Dean, Provost, and Executive Deputy Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. "The relatively easy access to the joint space, and its relatively compart-mentalized structure could make it an ideal target for localized gene therapy such as this."
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Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers 1F31AR067609, T32HL092332, T32GM088129, AI036211, CA125123, and RR024574. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

About the Journal

Human Gene Therapy, the Official Journal of the European Society of Gene and Cell Therapy, British Society for Gene and Cell Therapy, French Society of Cell and Gene Therapy, German Society of Gene Therapy, and five other gene therapy societies, is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly in print and online. Led by Editor-in-Chief Terence R. Flotte, MD, Celia and Isaac Haidak Professor of Medical Education and Dean, Provost, and Executive Deputy Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Human Gene Therapy presents reports on the transfer and expression of genes in mammals, including humans. Related topics include improvements in vector development, delivery systems, and animal models, particularly in the areas of cancer, heart disease, viral disease, genetic disease, and neurological disease, as well as ethical, legal, and regulatory issues related to the gene transfer in humans. Its companion journals, Human Gene Therapy Methods, published bimonthly and focused on the application of gene therapy to product testing and development, and Human Gene Therapy Clinical Development, published quarterly, features data relevant to the regulatory review and commercial development of cell and gene therapy products. Tables of contents for all three publications and a free sample issue may be viewed on the Human Gene Therapy website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Nucleic Acid Therapeutics, Tissue Engineering, Stem Cells and Development, and Cellular Reprogramming. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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