Nav: Home

How can hospitals keep doctors positively engaged with their work?

November 13, 2018

November 13, 2018 - Individual and work-related factors may be helpful in promoting positive engagement with work among hospital physicians, according to a study in the December issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

The study provides insights into the emerging evidence on the characteristics and outcomes affecting physician engagement - an area of growing focus in healthcare improvement efforts. "By understanding how individual and work characteristics impact engagement, hospital administrator leaders are better positioned to positively approach physician engagement within their hospitals," write Tyrone A. Perreira, PhD, MEd, and colleagues of University of Toronto and the Ontario Hospital Association.

Hospital Physician Engagement - Individual and Work-Related Factors

Building on the concept of "positive psychology," physician engagement is viewed as a critical factor for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare, increasing physician satisfaction and retention, and improving patient safety and outcomes. "'Engagement' in healthcare is often defined as a positive, fulfilling work-related state of mind, which is characterized by vigor, dedication and absorption," Dr. Perreira and coauthors write.

In a scoping review, the researchers identified 15 studies of hospital physician engagement. Reflecting the growing interest in this concept, all of the studies were published between 2012 and 2017. Dr. Perreira and colleagues performed quantitative and qualitative analyses to identify factors associated with physician engagement, as well as its impact on work outcomes.

The studies identified a range of individual characteristics related to physician engagement. Younger physicians (aged 26 to 35) had the highest physician engagement scores, but more experienced doctors were also more engaged. Single physicians had higher engagement than married physicians. Among physicians with children, men had higher engagement than women. Several personal attributes were linked to higher engagement, including resiliency, self-efficacy (confidence in the ability to get things done), and optimism.

Work-related characteristics related to increased engagement included higher quality of work life and increased job resources - for example, high levels of job control and supervisory and organizational support. In contrast, high job stress and high job demands were linked to lower physician engagement. Based on limited data, high physician engagement was associated with some important work outcomes, including increased job satisfaction, increased work ability, and decreased medical errors.

The study provides a useful initial overview of the emerging research for hospitals seeking to improve physician engagement, Dr. Perreira and colleagues believe. Although hospital leadership can't do much to change individual characteristics such as physician age, gender, or family life, knowledge of these factors may help in targeting doctors for interventions to improve physician engagement.

In contrast, the work-related factors might be helpful in guiding steps to promote engagement in healthcare settings. "Preliminary findings support healthy work environments, which include a good work-life balance, fair scheduling, as well as decreased job stress and job demands such as work overload and/or overtime," the researchers write.

Dr. Perreira and colleagues highlight the need for further research on hospital physician engagement, including the impact on key outcomes such as job satisfaction and patient safety. The authors believe their study provides a "strong evidence-based platform to further advance knowledge around physician engagement" - which may lead to new strategies to improve the hospital work environment, with the ultimate outcome of improving patient care.
-end-
Click here to read "Hospital Physician Engagement"

DOI: 10.1097/MLR.0000000000000983

About Medical Care

Rated as one of the top ten journals in health care administration, Medical Care is devoted to all aspects of the administration and delivery of health care. This scholarly journal publishes original, peer-reviewed papers documenting the most current developments in the rapidly changing field of health care. Medical Care provides timely reports on the findings of original investigations into issues related to the research, planning, organization, financing, provision, and evaluation of health services. In addition, numerous special supplementary issues that focus on specialized topics are produced with each volume. Medical Care is the official journal of the Medical Care Section of the American Public Health Association

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the health, tax & accounting, finance, risk & compliance, and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer, headquartered in the Netherlands, reported 2017 annual revenues of €4.4 billion. The company serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide.

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit http://healthclarity.wolterskluwer.com and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

Wolters Kluwer Health

Related Healthcare Articles:

Healthcare innovators focus on 'quality as a business strategy' -- update from Journal of Healthcare Quality
Despite two decades of effort -- targeting care processes, outcomes, and most recently the value of care - progress has been slow in closing the gap between quality and cost in the US healthcare system.
How runaway healthcare costs are a threat to older adults and what to do about it
Empowering Medicare to directly negotiate drug prices, accelerating the adoption of value-based care, using philanthropy as a catalyst for reform and expanding senior-specific models of care are among recommendations for reducing healthcare costs published in a new special report and supplement to the Winter 2019-20 edition of Generations, the journal of the American Society of Aging (ASA).
How can healthcare achieve real technology driven transformation?
Real transformation in healthcare through the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, telecommunications, and other advanced technologies could provide significant improvements in healthcare quality, productivity, and access.
Increasing transparency in the healthcare sector: More might not be better
More isn't always better. That's what researchers say when it comes to transparency in the US healthcare system.
LGBT+ women face barriers to healthcare
New study suggests diversity messaging is not filtering down to frontline staff.
US and China should collaborate, not compete, to bring AI to healthcare
In the wake of the US government ordering the Chinese artificial intelligence company, iCarbonX, to divest its majority ownership stake in the Cambridge, Mass.-based company PatientsLikeMe, Eric Topol, MD, of Scripps Research, has co-written a commentary arguing for more, not less, collaboration between China and the US on artificial intelligence (AI) development.
Study highlights need for integrated healthcare for the homeless
A University of Birmingham study has found alarming evidence of severe mental health problems, substance dependence and alcohol misuse amongst homeless population.
Understanding C. auris transmission with the healthcare environment
Researchers have now shown that patients who are heavily colonized with Candida auris on their skin can shed the fungus and contaminate their surroundings.
Three quarters of Americans concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals
Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Americans are concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals, according to new survey data released today by ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists).
Novel healthcare program for former prisoners reduces recidivism
A healthcare program tailored to the needs of recently released prisoners can significantly reduce recidivism, according to a new study led by a Yale researcher.
More Healthcare News and Healthcare Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.