Predicting the future in ovarian cancer

November 14, 2007

Kisspeptin and its receptor GPR54 predict a favourable clinical outcome in women with ovarian carcinoma, and are specific for the clear cell carcinoma subtype, research published this week in the online open access journal, BMC Medicine, reveals.

The kisspeptins, a family of peptide hormones, and the receptor GPR54 have previously been associated with anti-metastatic activity in certain human tumours. In this study, researchers have shown that kisspeptin and GPR54 are independent prognostic biomarkers specific for ovarian clear cell carcinoma - the first such markers to be identified.

A research team based at the BC Cancer Agency and Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, Canada created a tissue microarray - paraffin blocks which allow numerous tissue samples to be analysed simultaneously - from 518 cases of early-stage ovarian carcinoma. They analysed the samples using antibodies against kisspeptin and the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54. Cases that showed strong staining for either kisspeptin or GPR54 were scored as positive, the rest negative.

The study revealed that patients who were positive for both kisspeptin and GPR54 had a favourable prognosis as compared to those patients who were negative for both kisspeptin and GPR54 cases - both in terms of disease-specific survival and overall survival. Researchers also found that these molecular markers were significantly associated with the clear cell ovarian carcinomas subtype.

Few prognostic or predictive molecular markers for ovarian cancer exist, yet such markers could be vital for the early diagnosis and management of the disease. The authors propose that in the future, serum kisspeptin levels could provide a means to monitor disease activity, and kisspeptins may even have use as therapeutic agentsin women with ovarian clear cell carcinoma. These possibilities require further research, however.

They write: "We anticipate that the strong association of GPR54 and kisspeptin expression with outcome and clear cell type in ovarian carcinoma will stimulate fresh approaches to what is still a lethally intractable disease."
-end-
Article:
Kisspeptin and GPR54 immunoreactivity in a cohort of 518 patients defines favourable prognosis and clear cell subtype in ovarian carcinoma
Leah M Prentice, Christian Klausen, Steve Kalloger, Martin Kobel, Steven McKinney, Jennifer L Santos, Challayne Kenney, Erika Mehl, C. Blake Gilks, Peter Leung, Ken Swenerton, David G Huntsman and Samuel AJ Aparicio
BMC Medicine (in press)

During embargo, article available at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/imedia/5089363231463761_article.pdf?random=248456

After the embargo, article available from the journal website at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmed/

Article citation and URL available on request at press@biomedcentral.com on the day of publication

Please quote the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central's Open Access policy.

For author contact details please contact Nicole Adams (Press Office, BC Cancer Agency)
Phone: 604.675.8105
Email: nadams@bccancer.bc.ca

BMC Medicine publishes original research articles, technical advances and study protocols in any area of medical science or clinical practice. To be appropriate for BMC Medicine, articles need to be of special importance and broad interest. BMC Medicine (ISSN 1741-7015) is indexed/tracked/covered by PubMed, MEDLINE, BIOSIS, Scopus, CAS, Google Scholar and Thomson Scientific (ISI).

BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com) is an independent online publishing house committed to providing open access to peer-reviewed biological and medical research. This commitment is based on the view that immediate free access to research and the ability to freely archive and reuse published information is essential to the rapid and efficient communication of science.

BioMed Central currently publishes over 180 journals across biology and medicine. In addition to open-access original research, BioMed Central also publishes reviews, commentaries and other non-original-research content. Depending on the policies of the individual journal, this content may be open access or provided only to subscribers.

BioMed Central

Related Ovarian Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

Ovarian cancer cells cooperate to metastasize
In a study on human ovarian cancer cells in mice, Harvard Medical School researchers discovered a transient, cooperative interaction between cell subpopulations that allows otherwise nonmetastatic tumor cells to become aggressive and spread.

Photodynamic therapy used to treat ovarian cancer
Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the most promising methods of treating localized tumors.

Studying the development of ovarian cancer with organoids
Researchers from the group of Hans Clevers at the Hubrecht Institute have modeled the development and progression of high-grade serous ovarian cancer in mini-versions, or organoids, of the female reproductive organs of the mouse.

New class of drugs could treat ovarian cancer
A team of researchers across the University of Manchester have shown that a new class of drugs are able to stop ovarian cancer cells growing.

How to catch ovarian cancer earlier
Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed too late for effective treatment.

New compound could help treat ovarian cancer
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a compound that could be more effective in treating certain cancers than standard chemotherapy.

Epigenetic markers of ovarian cancer
Insilico Medicine and its collaborators from Johns Hopkins and Insilico Medicine, used an integrated approach by coupling identification of genome-wide expression patterns in multiple cohorts of primary ovarian cancer samples and normal ovarian surface epithelium with innovative computational analysis of gene expression data, leading to the discovery of novel cancer-specific epigenetically silenced genes.

Ovarian cancer statistics, 2018
A new report from the American Cancer Society provides an overview of ovarian cancer occurrence and mortality data.

Ovarian cancer drug shows promise in pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutation
A targeted therapy that has shown its power in fighting ovarian cancer in women including those with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may also help patients with aggressive pancreatic cancer who harbor these mutations and have few or no other treatment options.

TGen-led study finds potent anti-cancer drug effect in rare ovarian cancer
An anti-cancer drug used to fight leukemia shows promise against a rare and aggressive type of ovarian cancer -- small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT) -- which strikes young women and girls, according to a study led by the TGen.

Read More: Ovarian Cancer News and Ovarian Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.