2007 Albert Maucher Prize for Outstanding Young Geoscientists

November 14, 2007

Two young geoscientists have been selected to receive the Albert Maucher Prize by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) in honour of their outstanding research findings. The prize will be awarded on 8 November 2007 to Dr. Martin Blumenberg from the Institute of Biogeochemistry and Marine Chemistry at the University of Hamburg, who received the prize for his studies of anaerobic methane oxidation, and Dr. David Dolejs from the Bavarian Research Institute of Experimental Geochemistry and Geophysics at the University of Bayreuth for his work on the development of complex thermodynamic models of silicate-fluoride melts.

The Albert Maucher Prize, which includes an award of 10,000 euros for each winner, is generally conferred once every two years to young geoscientists in recognition of their outstanding research findings. It was the express wish of Albert Maucher, who donated the prize and who himself received DFG funding at the beginning of his scientific research career, that it should be awarded for original research approaches and methods.

The winners of the 2007 prize:

Dr. Martin Blumenberg (36), University of Hamburg

In his studies in organic geochemistry/isotopic geochemistry Martin Blumenberg has been looking at the anaerobic oxidation of methane, which occurs in ocean sediments and is responsible for about 90% of the natural decomposition of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The geobiological and biogeochemical aspects he has been studying are not only of key importance for the present, but also for the past development of the earth's climate. Blumenberg's work has highlighted the importance of methanotrophic bacteria.

Dr. David Dolejs (33), University of Bayreuth

David Dolejs has made a significant contribution to the field of high pressure mineralogy with his work on experimental simulation of geochemical cycles within our planet. His research includes the physical and chemical properties of melts and liquid phases in multi-phase systems, and he has developed a thermodynamic model for silicate melts, making it easier to understand the complex phase mixture and melt structure. Amongst other things, his work at the boundary between material science, chemistry, engineering and mineral physics is important for the study of mineral deposits.
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Further Information:

Profiles and CVs for both of the prizewinners are available on the internet at http://www.dfg.de/en/news/scientific_prizes/maucher_preis/.

Further information on the Albert Maucher Prize is available at http://www.dfg.de/en/research_funding/scientific_prizes/albert_maucher_prize_geosciences.html.

For further information about the Albert Maucher Prize, please contact Dr. Sören Dürr at the DFG's Physics, Mathematics, Geosciences Division, Tel. +49 228 885-2328, e-mail Soeren.Duerr@dfg.de.

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

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