Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Nov. 2007

November 14, 2007

MATERIALS -- Ready, aim . . .

As the new hunting season begins, an Ohio-based company is introducing a high performance bullet based on technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The new bullet promises more precision and superior terminal ballistics and is lead-free and safe for the environment. Recently licensed to WolfTech of Wakeman, Ohio, the technology is first being made available to muzzle-loading hunters as part of a high performance system sold by MDM in Vermont. The bullets' composition--mixtures of tungsten and other metals or alloys--make them ideal for high performance hunting and target applications. The products will also help answer demand for greener ammunition as lead bullets are being banned in some states. [Contact: Larisa Brass, (865) 574-4163; brasslm@ornl.gov]




MEDICAL -- Back pain modeling . . .

Diagnosing back problems and predicting the outcome of surgery could become a lot more accurate because of a project awarded to Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and Vanderbilt. With an estimated 80 percent to 90 percent of people in the United States experiencing lower back pain at some point in their lives, the orthopedic community is increasingly interested in predictive assessments of treatments. The National Institutes of Health and National Institute for Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases asked the team to develop a computational model that could eventually be used to predict in vivo contact stresses at the bearing surface interfaces, ligament forces that provide constraint and muscle forces of the vertebral bodies of the lower back. The clinical and computational data will be correlated and validated with the physicians and patients at Vanderbilt. [Contact: Ron Walli, (865) 576-0226; wallira@ornl.gov]




ENERGY -- Supercharged solar panels . . .

Inexpensive aluminum reflectors are helping to make a 700-watt solar system designed by JX Crystals far more efficient and less expensive than conventional solar panels. The four 175-watt panels concentrate the sun up to three times its normal strength, which reduces by two-thirds the amount of expensive silicon solar cells required to produce the same amount of electricity. To further enhance the efficiency of the system, an inexpensive solar tracker keeps the panels pointed toward the sun throughout the day. This increases the energy output as much as 35 percent in some regions. A system installed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is producing electrical performance and efficiency data that was presented by ORNL's Curt Maxey at a recent international conference in Germany. The panel was purchased by the lab's Facilities Management Division for evaluation purposes. [Contact: Ron Walli, (865) 576-0226; wallira@ornl.gov]
-end-
To arrange for an interview with a researcher, please contact the Communications and External Relations staff member identified at the end of each tip. For more information on ORNL and its research and development activities, please refer to one of our Media Contacts. If you have a general media-related question or comment, you can send it to news@ornl.gov.

DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Related Technology Articles from Brightsurf:

December issue SLAS Technology features 'advances in technology to address COVID-19'
The December issue of SLAS Technology is a special collection featuring the cover article, ''Advances in Technology to Address COVID-19'' by editors Edward Kai-Hua Chow, Ph.D., (National University of Singapore), Pak Kin Wong, Ph.D., (The Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA) and Xianting Ding, Ph.D., (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China).

October issue SLAS Technology now available
The October issue of SLAS Technology features the cover article, 'Role of Digital Microfl-uidics in Enabling Access to Laboratory Automation and Making Biology Programmable' by Varun B.

Robot technology for everyone or only for the average person?
Robot technology is being used more and more in health rehabilitation and in working life.

Novel biomarker technology for cancer diagnostics
A new way of identifying cancer biomarkers has been developed by researchers at Lund University in Sweden.

Technology innovation for neurology
TU Graz researcher Francesco Greco has developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are hardly noticeable on the skin and make long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier.

April's SLAS Technology is now available
April's Edition of SLAS Technology Features Cover Article, 'CURATE.AI: Optimizing Personalized Medicine with Artificial Intelligence'.

Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education.

Post-lithium technology
Next-generation batteries will probably see the replacement of lithium ions by more abundant and environmentally benign alkali metal or multivalent ions.

Rethinking the role of technology in the classroom
Introducing tablets and laptops to the classroom has certain educational virtues, according to Annahita Ball, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo School of Social Work, but her research suggests that tech has its limitations as well.

The science and technology of FAST
The Five hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), located in a radio quiet zone, with the targets (e.g., radio pulsars and neutron stars, galactic and extragalactic 21-cm HI emission).

Read More: Technology News and Technology Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.