YeastBook, the Eukaryotic Cell Encyclopedia is launched by Genetics

November 14, 2011

A new series of article-chapters to be published in the journal GENETICS (http://www.genetics.org) promises to help scientists better access the wealth of research knowledge obtained on an important experimental organism used to understand human gene function. The series will be authored by top geneticists from around the world and will cover practically all aspects of modern yeast research and its applications to human health and well-being.

"When investigators identify a gene in other organisms, they first look in the Saccharomyces Genome Database for a homologue," wrote Alan Hinnebusch, Editor-in-Chief of YeastBook and Mark Johnston, Editor-in-Chief of GENETICS, in an editorial appearing in the November issue of GENETICS. "Because of decades of work on S. cerevisiae by a large research community with access to a prodigious experimental toolbox, finding a homologue (which happens more than half the time) brings not only a wealth of information that provides much insight into the gene's function, but also a robust experimental system for further investigations that promise new insights."

The series of chapters published as articles will not only help organize and analyze the overwhelming amount of data obtained on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but it will also serve as a significant reference tool for those who do not specialize on this organism. In total, the editors of YeastBook and GENETICS anticipate that the compendium will span 50 chapters, but as new research developments occur, the need for additional chapters may arise and will be accommodated by this innovative publishing model.

YeastBook expands on the seminal monograph series The Molecular Biology of the Yeast Saccharomyces, first published by Cold Spring Harbor Press in the early 1980s and last updated more than 15 years ago. After YeastBook articles are published in GENETICS they will be compiled on a separate YeastBook web site. By publishing in GENETICS first, each chapter will benefit from the journal's publishing methods and infrastructure, such as its peer review system and online publishing platform, while allowing for continual updating as needed. In addition to the scrutiny of GENETICS' peer review, each chapter will be edited by a select group of leaders with broad expertise in Saccharomyces biology. The YeastBook editors were recruited by GENETICS' Editorial Board and the Board of Directors of the Genetics Society of America, and represent some of the world's top experts in this field.

"This is a novel approach for publication of a monograph, and it will serve the scientific community well," said Mark Johnston, Editor-in-Chief of GENETICS. "The chapters will be published in a timely fashion, and they will enjoy wide visibility in the pages of a well-regarded journal. I hope this will be the first of several such 'books' published in our journal."

Alan G. Hinnebush, Ph.D., Head of the Program in Cellular Regulation and Metabolism within the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, is the Editor-in-Chief of YeastBook. Mark Johnston, Chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, is Editor-in-Chief of GENETICS.
-end-
Since 1916, GENETICS (http://www.genetics.org) has covered high quality, original research on a range of topics bearing on inheritance, including population and evolutionary genetics, complex traits, developmental and behavioral genetics, cellular genetics, gene expression, genome integrity and transmission, and genome and systems biology. GENETICS, the peer-reviewed, peer-edited journal of the Genetics Society of America is one of the world's most cited journals in genetics and heredity.

Founded in 1931, the Genetics Society of America (GSA) is the professional membership organization for nearly 5,000 scientific researchers, educators, bioengineers, bioinformaticians and others who work to advance knowledge in genetics, from the molecular to the population level.

Genetics Society of America

Related Genetics Articles from Brightsurf:

Human genetics: A look in the mirror
Genome Biology and Evolution's latest virtual issue highlights recent research published in the journal within the field of human genetics.

The genetics of blood: A global perspective
To better understand the properties of blood cells, an international team led by UdeM's Guillaume Lettre has been examining variations in the DNA of 746,667 people worldwide.

Turning to genetics to treat little hearts
Researchers makes a breakthrough in understanding the mechanisms of a common congenital heart disease.

New drugs more likely to be approved if backed up by genetics
A new drug candidate is more likely to be approved for use if it targets a gene known to be linked to the disease; a finding that can help pharmaceutical companies to focus their drug development efforts.

Mapping millet genetics
New DNA sequences will aid in the development of improved millet varieties

Genetics to feed the world
A study, published in Nature Genetics, demonstrated the effectiveness of the technology known as genomic selection in a wheat improvement program.

The genetics of cancer
A research team has identified a new circular RNA (ribonucleic acid) that increases tumor activity in soft tissue and connective tissue tumors.

New results on fungal genetics
An international team of researchers has found unusual genetic features in fungi of the order Trichosporonales.

Mouse genetics influences the microbiome more than environment
Genetics has a greater impact on the microbiome than maternal birth environment, at least in mice, according to a study published this week in Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

New insights into genetics of fly longevity
Alexey Moskalev, Ph.D., Head of the Laboratory of Molecular Radiobiology and Gerontology Institute of Biology, and co-authors from the Institute of biology of Komi Science Center of RAS, Engelgard's Institute of molecular biology, involved in the study of the aging mechanisms and longevity of model animals announce the publication of a scientific article titled: 'The Neuronal Overexpression of Gclc in Drosophila melanogaster Induces Life Extension With Longevity-Associated Transcriptomic Changes in the Thorax' in Frontiers in Genetics - a leading open science platform.

Read More: Genetics News and Genetics Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.