Post heart attack recovery may not be aided by stem cell injections, but trial demonstrates promise

November 14, 2011

CLEVELAND/ORLANDO - University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers could still be close to giving heart attack patients a second chance...just not as they originally thought.

LateTIME was a study of adult stem cells (autologous) harnessed from bone marrow that were believed to have the ability to improve heart function after an attack if injected into the heart within two weeks of the attack. Results are being released today at American Heart Association Scientific Sessions and published this week in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

The results have shown the injections within that timeframe were not favorable, but the concept showed great promise, according to an accompanying JAMA editorial that assessed the trial.

The therapy still shows promise for recovering lost or damaged heart tissue resulting from a heart attack. Both UH Case Medical Center's Drs. Dan Simon and Marco Costa, co-investigators in the LateTIME study, are currently participating in a similar trial, "TIME" that already has reduced the time between attack and stem cell injection.

The pair is optimistic the time variable adjustment in the new trial will lend favorable outcomes. Dr. Simon is Chief, Cardiovascular Medicine at UH Case Medical Center and the Herman K. Hellerstein Professor of Cardiovascular Research, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. Dr. Costa is the director of the Interventional Cardiovascular Center and Research & Innovation Center at UH Case Medical Center as well as a professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

The shared theories in both trials is that the specialized cells could have the ability to promote blood vessel growth, prevent cell death and transform themselves into a number of tissues, including muscle. After an acute heart attack, a remodeling process was initiated in the heart in an attempt to compensate for the damaged areas.

Researchers surmised that the condition of the heart muscle several weeks after the attack may differ considerably from the heart muscle in the acute stage setting. For some patients delaying the delivery of stem cells by two to three weeks may have been better than initiating the treatment during the acute phase.

All patients underwent baseline assessments that included medical history, physical exam, electrocardiogram, blood draws, echocardiogram and MRI tests. Participants were then assigned randomly to receive the stem cells or placebo within the aforementioned two to three week timeline.

The morning of stem cell or placebo infusion, a blood draw and bone marrow aspiration procedure of the hip bone are conducted to collect the stem cells. Later the same day, either stem cells or placebo are then infused through a catheter and directly into the damaged area of the heart.

Following the first 24 hours of the infusion, participants wear a small ECG machine, or Holter monitor. Additionally, patients record their body temperature twice a day for 30 days post infusion. Follow up visits at months one, three, six, 12 and 24 where baseline assessment testing are conducted.
-end-
The TIME trial adjusts that variable and results will be published in two years.

University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Related Stem Cells Articles from Brightsurf:

SUTD researchers create heart cells from stem cells using 3D printing
SUTD researchers 3D printed a micro-scaled physical device to demonstrate a new level of control in the directed differentiation of stem cells, enhancing the production of cardiomyocytes.

More selective elimination of leukemia stem cells and blood stem cells
Hematopoietic stem cells from a healthy donor can help patients suffering from acute leukemia.

Computer simulations visualize how DNA is recognized to convert cells into stem cells
Researchers of the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW - The Netherlands) and the Max Planck Institute in Münster (Germany) have revealed how an essential protein helps to activate genomic DNA during the conversion of regular adult human cells into stem cells.

First events in stem cells becoming specialized cells needed for organ development
Cell biologists at the University of Toronto shed light on the very first step stem cells go through to turn into the specialized cells that make up organs.

Surprising research result: All immature cells can develop into stem cells
New sensational study conducted at the University of Copenhagen disproves traditional knowledge of stem cell development.

The development of brain stem cells into new nerve cells and why this can lead to cancer
Stem cells are true Jacks-of-all-trades of our bodies, as they can turn into the many different cell types of all organs.

Healthy blood stem cells have as many DNA mutations as leukemic cells
Researchers from the Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology have shown that the number of mutations in healthy and leukemic blood stem cells does not differ.

New method grows brain cells from stem cells quickly and efficiently
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a faster method to generate functional brain cells, called astrocytes, from embryonic stem cells.

NUS researchers confine mature cells to turn them into stem cells
Recent research led by Professor G.V. Shivashankar of the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore and the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology in Italy, has revealed that mature cells can be reprogrammed into re-deployable stem cells without direct genetic modification -- by confining them to a defined geometric space for an extended period of time.

Researchers develop a new method for turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have for the first time succeeded in converting human skin cells into pluripotent stem cells by activating the cell's own genes.

Read More: Stem Cells News and Stem Cells Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.