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Mother's blood sugar measurement associated with baby's congenital heart disease risk

November 14, 2016

NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 14, 2016 -- For the first time, researchers have shown that the level of blood sugar measured in the first trimester of pregnancy may be associated with the risk of delivering a baby with congenital heart disease, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.

Researchers looked at blood sugar levels measured during the first trimester in a study of 19,107 pregnant women.

They found that for every 10 mg/dL increase in blood sugar, the risk of delivering a baby with congenital heart disease rose about 8 percent.

The association between elevated blood sugar in early pregnancy and congenital heart disease risk was better than the predictive ability of the oral glucose tolerance test, which is currently used to identify mothers at risk for carrying children with congenital heart disease, researchers said.
-end-
Emmi Helle, M.D., Ph.D., M.Sc. (Economics), Stanford University, Stanford, California.

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

American Heart Association

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