Nav: Home

Mild cognitive impairment patients take about 3 medications for concomittant diseases

November 14, 2016

Researchers from 20 European centres of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (EADC) studied 880 Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients (375 males, 505 females) older than 55 years old and without obvious causes of cognitive impairment. MCI is considered to be an intermediate stage between normal age-related cognitive decline and dementia. A complete history was obtained for all patients. In addition, demographical data were collected and several factors were studied, including the types and dosages of the medications taken.

Dr Vasileios Papaliagkas, the corresponding author of the paper, pointed that the vast majority of MCI patients were taking at least one medication, whereas slightly less than half of the patients (40%) took at least 4 medications. The types of medications that were most often taken for concomitant diseases were cardiovascular drugs (62.0%), antidepressants (16.8%), sedatives (14.6%), thyroid drugs (10.0%) and anti-diabetic drugs (7.6%). Drugs with anticholinergic effects may affect cognition in the elderly and their simultaneous use might cause cognitive impairment and reduction in daily functioning activities. They should be given with caution and only with a doctor's prescription and over the counter drugs should be avoided. The existence of medical co-morbidities does not appear to increase the risk of dementia progression. Female and less educated patients are more likely to take medications.
-end-
For More information about the article, please visit http://benthamscience.com/journals/current-alzheimer-research/volume/13/issue/12/page/1407/

DOI: 10.2174/1567205013666160603002704

Reference: Tsolaki, M.; et al (2016). MCI Patients in Europe: Medication and Comorbidities. The DESCRIPA Study. Curr Alzheimer Res., DOI: 10.2174/1567205013666160603002704

Bentham Science Publishers

Related Dementia Articles:

Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia
A research team from the University of Plymouth, University of Southampton and the Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Center, Vari, Greece, have studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia.
Stroke prevention may also reduce dementia
Ontario's stroke prevention strategy appears to have had an unexpected, beneficial side effect: a reduction also in the incidence of dementia among older seniors.
Dementia: The right to rehabilitation
Rehabilitation is important for people with dementia as it is for people with physical disabilities, according to a leading dementia expert.
One in 4 elderly Australian women have dementia
At least a quarter of Australian women over 70 will develop dementia according to University of Queensland researchers.
Rural dementia -- we need to talk
Research carried out by Plymouth University into the experience of dementia in farming and farming families, and its impact on their businesses and home lives, has identified four areas of concern which need to be addressed if dementia in the countryside is to be managed.
Women with dementia receive less medical attention
Women with dementia have fewer visits to the GP, receive less health monitoring and take more potentially harmful medication than men with dementia, new UCL research reveals.
Dementia on the downslide, especially among people with more education
In a hopeful sign for the health of the nation's brains, the percentage of American seniors with dementia is dropping, a new study finds.
New study suggests rethink of dementia causes
University of Adelaide researchers have developed a new theory for the causes of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases, involving an out-of-control immune system.
Bleeding stroke associated with onset of dementia
Bleeding within the brain, or intracerebral hemorrhage, was associated with a high risk of developing dementia post stroke, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2016.
Dementia: New insights into causes of loss of orientation
The University of Exeter Medical School led two studies, each of which moves us a step closer to understanding the onset of dementia, and potentially to paving the way for future therapies.

Related Dementia Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#532 A Class Conversation
This week we take a look at the sociology of class. What factors create and impact class? How do we try and study it? How does class play out differently in different countries like the US and the UK? How does it impact the political system? We talk with Daniel Laurison, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College and coauthor of the book "The Class Ceiling: Why it Pays to be Privileged", about class and its impacts on people and our systems.