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Inclusion of the ACM Prize in Computing recipients increases number of HLF Laureates

November 14, 2016

The Heidelberg Laureate Forum is an annual networking event that unites the laureates of computer science and mathematics with brilliant, precisely selected young researchers from around the globe for a week of intensive exchange. All recipients of the ACM Prize in Computing will be cordially invited to attend the 5th Heidelberg Laureate Forum next September 24-29, to profoundly interact with fellow laureates and young researchers in computer science and mathematics.

The history of the ACM Prize in Computing: Ten years ago, the ACM established the Infosys Foundation Award in Computing Science to "recognize personal contributions by young scientists and system developers to a contemporary innovation that, through its depth, fundamental impact and broad implications, exemplifies the greatest achievements in the discipline." The prize was commonly referred to as the Infosys Award and was accompanied by funding from Infosys. Due to the award's eminence, it has been renamed the ACM Prize in Computing and funding from the Infosys Ltd. has been raised to $250,000.

Significant developments in the wake of the 4th HLF, from the HLFF being joined by two substantial scientific partners to the HLF Laureates expanding with the inclusion of the ACM Prize in Computing recipients, have sparked excitement and heightened anticipation for the 5th Heidelberg Laureate Forum.

More information regarding the ACM Prize in Computing can be found here: http://awards.acm.org/acmprize/

For further information pertaining to the Heidelberg Laureate Forum, please visit the homepage: http://www.heidelberg-laureate-forum.org/

Background

The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The 5th Heidelberg Laureate Forum will take place from September 24 to 29, 2017. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the International Mathematical Union (IMU), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA).
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To the Editors

With this press release, we would like to extend an invitation to attend and report on the 5th Heidelberg Laureate Forum.

Press Inquiries/Contact for Journalists

Wylder Green
Christiane Schirok
Communications
Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 33, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany
media[at]heidelberg-laureate-forum.org
Telephone: +49-6221-533-384

Internet: http://www.heidelberg-laureate-forum.org/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeidelbergLaureateForum/
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/HLForum
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/LaureateForum
Science Blog: http://scilogs.spektrum.de/hlf/
Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hlforum/albums

Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation

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