Nav: Home

Special JAMA Internal Medicine theme series focuses on firearm violence

November 14, 2016

JAMA Internal Medicine has published online a collection of research and opinion articles in a special theme series focused on firearm violence.

"With the 2016 Presidential and Congressional elections behind us, there is again an opportunity for the United States to respond to firearm violence with high-quality research and effective policies and laws, not political posturing and heated rhetoric. Firearm injuries and gun violence will remain public health priorities, and our focus will be ongoing. We hope you will find this series informative, thoughtful, and a spur to further research and impactful analysis," JAMA Internal Medicine Editor at Large Robert Steinbrook, M.D., of the Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn., and coauthors wrote in an accompanying editorial.

The articles featured in the series are each highlighted below, along with a podcast with authors of two of the articles. All the material is available on the For The Media website. Related information also can be found in The JAMA Network collection on firearms violence.

* Original Research: "Evaluating the Impact of Florida's 'Stand Your Ground' Self-defense Law on Homicide and Suicide by Firearm: An Interrupted Time Series Study"

Conclusion: "The implementation of Florida's 'stand your ground' self-defense law was associated with a significant increase in homicides and homicides by firearm but no change in rates of suicide or suicide by firearm," according to the article.

To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Links will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.6811

* Special Communication: "Temporary Transfer of Firearms From the Home to Prevent Suicide: Legal Obstacles and Recommendations"

Excerpt: "The presence of firearms in the home increases the risk of suicide for residents. As a result, clinicians and professional organizations recommend counseling about temporary removal of firearms from the home of potentially suicidal individuals. In some states, however, firearm laws may affect the ability to easily transfer a gun temporarily to reduce suicide risk. ... . We identify both helpful and problematic aspects of state laws regarding temporary transfer of firearms. We provide recommendations for amending UBC [universal background check] laws to make it easier for clinicians and patients to temporarily transfer firearms," according to the article.

To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Links will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.5704

* Special Communication: "Testing the Immunity of the Firearm Industry to Tort Litigation"

Excerpt: "In the absence of congressional action to reinstate the federal ban on assault weapons, tort litigation offers an alternative strategy for regulating what have become the weapons of choice in mass shootings. However, opportunities to bring successful claims are limited. ... In one particularly high-profile lawsuit, families of victims of the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012 sued the makers and sellers of the military-style rifle used in the attack, alleging negligence and deceptive marketing. The trial court dismissed the case on October 14, 2016, but the plaintiffs plan to appeal. We review the history of tort litigation against the firearm industry, outline the Newtown families' claims and describe the decision," according to the article.

To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Links will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.7043

* Review: "Firearm Laws and Firearm Homicides: A Systematic Review"

Conclusion: "The strength of firearm legislation in general, and laws related to strengthening background checks and permit-to-purchase in particular, is associated with decreased firearm homicide rates. High-quality research is important to further evaluate the effectiveness of these laws. Legislation is just one part of a multipronged approach that will be necessary to decrease firearm homicides in the United States," according to the article.

To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Links will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.7051

* Research Letter: "Trends in Research Publications About Gun Violence in the United States, 1960 to 2014

Introduction: "To assess trends in scientific research on the association between guns, crimes, and violence, this study examined changes over time in the number of published articles and the number of researchers writing them. As publications are a major means for the dissemination of scientific knowledge, their volume can serve as a measure of scientific attention," according to the article.

To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Links will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.7076

* Viewpoint: "Reducing Suicides Through Partnerships Between Health Professionals and Gun Owner Groups-- Beyond Docs vs Glocks"

To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Links will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.6712

* Viewpoint: "The Role of Physicians in Preventing Firearm Suicides"

To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Links will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.6715

* Editorial: "Firearm Violence: A JAMA Internal Medicine Series"

To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Links will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.7180

* Author Interview Podcast: Also available is an author audio interview with David K. Humphreys, Ph.D., of the University of Oxford, England, the corresponding author of "Evaluating the Impact of Florida's 'Stand Your Ground' Self-defense Law on Homicide and Suicide by Firearm: An Interrupted Time Series Study" and Michelle M. Mello, J.D., Ph.D., of Stanford Law School and Stanford University School of Medicine, California, the corresponding author of "Testing the Immunity of the Firearm Industry to Tort Litigation." The interview is available for preview on the For The Media website. The podcast will be live when the embargo lifts on the JAMA Internal Medicine website.

Editor's Note: Please see individual articles for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-


The JAMA Network Journals

Related Suicide Articles:

Racial discrimination linked to suicide
New research findings from the University of Houston indicate that racial discrimination is so painful that it is linked to the ability to die by suicide, a presumed prerequisite for being able to take one's own life, and certain mental health tools - like reframing an incident - can help.
Factors associated with firearm suicide risk
Researchers compared the risk of suicide by firearm based on sociodemographic characteristics of US adults.
Suicide mortality and COVID-19
Reasons why U.S. suicide rates may rise in tandem with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are explained in this article that also describes opportunities to expand research and care.
Media reports of celebrity suicide linked to increased suicide rates
Media reporting of suicide, especially celebrity suicides, is associated with increases in suicide in the general population, particularly by the same method as used by the celebrity, finds an analysis of the latest evidence published by The BMJ today.
More youth suicide found in poor communities across US
A study led by Jennifer Hoffmann, M.D., from Ann & Robert H.
BU study finds new factors linked to suicide
A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that physical illness and injury raises the risk of suicide in men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person's risk of suicide.
Investigating the full spectrum of suicide
A recent study published in Injury Prevention described a method for categorizing self-injury mortality (SIM) to help us better examine national trends for today's epidemics of suicide and drug-related deaths.
Between 16 and 18% of preadolescents have ideas of suicide
Thinking of taking one's own life (ideation), planning it, threatening to do it or even attempting to do it is regarded as suicidal behaviour.
Social networks and suicide prevention
Depression and mental health problems are increasing - and suicide and drug overdose rates are rising dramatically in the USA.
Stoic, resourceful -- and at risk for suicide
A new study led by a University of Georgia researcher, in collaboration with epidemiologists from the Georgia Department of Public Health, has identified some common factors associated with farmer suicide that may help health providers develop strategies to reduce suicide risk.
More Suicide News and Suicide Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Warped Reality
False information on the internet makes it harder and harder to know what's true, and the consequences have been devastating. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around technology and deception. Guests include law professor Danielle Citron, journalist Andrew Marantz, and computer scientist Joy Buolamwini.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

How to Win Friends and Influence Baboons
Baboon troops. We all know they're hierarchical. There's the big brutish alpha male who rules with a hairy iron fist, and then there's everybody else. Which is what Meg Crofoot thought too, before she used GPS collars to track the movements of a troop of baboons for a whole month. What she and her team learned from this data gave them a whole new understanding of baboon troop dynamics, and, moment to moment, who really has the power.  This episode was reported and produced by Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.