Nav: Home

Wind and solar energy projects could bring 5,000 new jobs to rural Minnesota

November 14, 2016

Minnesota has undergone a remarkable transformation in its energy landscape over the past decade. Coal, once the dominant fuel source for Minnesota's electric utilities, has given way to new types of energy resources -- wind and solar among them. While Minnesota's state energy policies have been a large driver in the shift from fossil fuels to renewables, the federal Production Tax Credit and Investment Tax Credit have played a major role in shaping the state's clean energy economy while keeping rates affordable for utility customers, according to a new report from the University of Minnesota Energy Transition Lab. ETL is a strategic initiative of Institute on the Environment, supported by the Law School and the Office of the Vice President for Research.

The report "analyzes real proposed projects, not theoretical ones," says Ellen Anderson, ETL's executive director. "Extension of federal policies for wind and solar development are helping Minnesota residents, businesses and schools save on their energy bills and procure locally-produced wind and solar energy," says Anderson.

Among the report's highlights:
  • The clean energy economy is continuing to expand in Minnesota, providing low-cost energy, creating jobs and economic impact.
  • Federal and state policies, especially extension of the Investment Tax Credit and Production Tax Credit, are helping Minnesota see significant new renewable energy projects, jobs, ratepayer savings and economic benefits.
  • Modeling shows that planned additions of wind and solar projects in the state will result in approximately $7.09 billion in direct investment, over 5,000 jobs related to construction alone and 3,987 megawatts of newly installed energy capacity.
  • Distributed generation of solar energy has almost doubled in the past two years, with businesses citing the ITC as a major driver in their success.
"These projects will not only expand renewable energy in Minnesota, they will create more than 5,000 jobs and over $7 billion in direct economic impact in 18 mostly rural Minnesota counties," says Anderson.
-end-
The University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment is leading the way toward a future in which people and the environment prosper together. For more information, visit environment.umn.edu.

University of Minnesota

Related Solar Energy Articles:

Air pollution casts shadow over solar energy production
Global solar energy production is taking a major hit due to air pollution and dust.
Freshwater from salt water using only solar energy
A federally funded research effort to revolutionize water treatment has yielded a direct solar desalination technology that uses energy from sunlight alone to heat salt water for membrane distillation.
New technology will enable properties to share solar energy
New technology will enable properties to share solar energy and will mean low energy bills for consumers.
Solar paint offers endless energy from water vapor
Researchers in Melbourne, Australia, have developed a compound that draws moisture from the air and splits it into oxygen and hydrogen.
Solar cell design with over 50 percent energy-conversion efficiency
Solar cells convert the sun's energy into electricity by converting photons into electrons.
More Solar Energy News and Solar Energy Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...