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UT AgResearch Dean recognized for leadership excellence

November 14, 2016

AUSTIN, Texas - Bill Brown, dean of University of Tennessee AgResearch, was honored for the leadership he has provided to the Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station and the Southern Region Experiment Station Section (ESS) during the annual meeting of the Association of Public Land-grant Universities.

Brown was presented the ESS Excellence in Leadership Award for the Southern Region during a November 13th ceremony in Austin, Texas. The award is presented annually to five individuals who have served their regional associations and the national land-grant system with exemplary distinction.

According to Shirley Hymon-Parker, chair of the Experiment Station Committee on Organization and Policy, award recipients personify the highest levels of excellence by enhancing the cause and performance of the Regional Associations and ESS in achieving their missions and the land-grant ideal.

Brown has served as Dean of AgResearch and Director of the Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station since 2008. In this role, Brown coordinates the research efforts of more than 160 faculty, staff and graduate students, while also overseeing the management of 10 AgResearch and Education Centers.

UTIA was also a participating institution in the research project receiving APLU's National Award for Excellence in Multistate Research. The project is titled "Fly Management in Animal Agriculture Systems and Impacts on Animal Health and Food Safety." Additionally, Robert Burns, associate dean of UT Extension, was recognized during the APLU conference as a Food Systems Leadership Institute Fellow.
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Through its mission of research, teaching and extension, the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture touches lives and provides Real. Life. Solutions. ag.tennessee.edu

University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture

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