Nav: Home

New technology makes artificial intelligence more private and portable

November 14, 2017

Technology developed at the University of Waterloo is paving the way for artificial intelligence (AI) to break free of the internet and cloud computing.

New deep-learning AI software produced with that technology is compact enough to fit on mobile computer chips for use in everything from smartphones to industrial robots.

That would allow devices to operate independent of the internet while using AI that performs almost as well as tethered neural networks.

"We feel this has enormous potential," said Alexander Wong, a systems design engineering professor and Waterloo and co-creator of the technology. "This could be an enabler in many fields where people are struggling to get deep-learning AI in an operational form."

The use of stand-alone deep-learning AI could lead to much lower data processing and transmission costs, greater privacy and use in areas where existing technology is impractical due to expense or other factors.

Deep-learning AI, which mimics the human brain by processing data through layers and layers of artificial neurons, typically requires considerable computational power, memory and energy to function.

Researchers took a page from evolutionary forces in nature to make that AI far more efficient by placing it in a virtual environment, then progressively and repeatedly depriving it of resources.

The deep-learning AI responds by adapting and changing itself to keep functioning each time computational power and memory are taken away.

"These networks evolve themselves through generations and make themselves smaller to be able to survive in these environments," said Mohammad Javad Shafiee, a systems design engineering research professor at Waterloo and the technology's co-creator.

In work recently presented during the International Conference on Computer Vision in Venice, Italy, the researchers achieved a 200-fold reduction in the size of deep-learning AI software used for a particular object recognition task.

When put on a chip and embedded in a smartphone, such compact AI could run its speech-activated virtual assistant and other intelligent features, greatly reducing data usage and operating without internet service.

Other potential applications range from use in low-cost drones and smart grids, to surveillance cameras and manufacturing plants, where there are significant issues around streaming sensitive or proprietary data to the cloud.

Wong and Shafiee, who have co-founded a company called DarwinAI to commercialize their efficient AI software, were "amazed" at the results when they first attempted their approach to evolving deep-learning AI about three years ago.

"We are researchers, so we explore many different things," said Shafiee. "And if it works, we keep going and push harder."
-end-


University of Waterloo

Related Memory Articles:

Taking photos of experiences boosts visual memory, impairs auditory memory
A quick glance at any social media platform will tell you that people love taking photos of their experiences -- whether they're lying on the beach, touring a museum, or just waiting in line at the grocery store.
Think you know how to improve your memory? Think again
Research from Katherine Duncan at the University of Toronto suggests we may have to rethink how we improve memory.
Improving memory with magnets
The ability to remember sounds, and manipulate them in our minds, is incredibly important to our daily lives -- without it we would not be able to understand a sentence, or do simple arithmetic.
Who has the better memory -- men or women?
In the battle of the sexes, women have long claimed that they can remember things better and longer than men can.
New study of the memory through optogenetics
A collaboration between Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Harvard University pioneers the increase of memory using optogenetics in mice in Spain.
Peppermint tea can help improve your memory
Peppermint tea can improve long-term and working memory and in healthy adults.
A new glimpse into working memory
MIT study finds bursts of neural activity as the brain holds information in mind, overturns a long-held model.
Memory ensembles
For over forty years, neuro-scientists have been interested in the biological mechanisms underlying the storage of the information that our brain records every day.
What is your memory style?
Why is it that some people have richly detailed recollection of past experiences (episodic memory), while others tend to remember just the facts without details (semantic memory)?
Watching a memory form
Neuroscientists at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science have discovered a novel mechanism for memory formation.

Related Memory Reading:

Unlimited Memory: How to Use Advanced Learning Strategies to Learn Faster, Remember More and be More Productive
by Kevin Horsley (Author)

Memory Rescue: Supercharge Your Brain, Reverse Memory Loss, and Remember What Matters Most
by Daniel G. Amen (Author)

Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything
by Joshua Foer (Author)

The Memory Book: The Classic Guide to Improving Your Memory at Work, at School, and at Play
by Harry Lorayne (Author), Jerry Lucas (Author)

Memory Man (Memory Man series)
by David Baldacci (Author)

In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind
by Eric R. Kandel (Author)

How to Develop a Brilliant Memory Week by Week: 50 Proven Ways to Enhance Your Memory Skills
by Dominic O'Brien (Author)

The Memory Illusion: Remembering, Forgetting, and the Science of False Memory
by Dr. Julia Shaw (Author)

Memory
by Alan Baddeley (Author), Michael W. Eysenck (Author), Michael C. Anderson (Author)

Memory (Miles Vorkosigan Adventures)
by Lois McMaster Bujold (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Why We Hate
From bullying to hate crimes, cruelty is all around us. So what makes us hate? And is it learned or innate? This hour, TED speakers explore the causes and consequences of hate — and how we can fight it. Guests include reformed white nationalist Christian Picciolini, CNN commentator Sally Kohn, podcast host Dylan Marron, and writer Anand Giridharadas.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#482 Body Builders
This week we explore how science and technology can help us walk when we've lost our legs, see when we've gone blind, explore unfriendly environments, and maybe even make our bodies better, stronger, and faster than ever before. We speak to Adam Piore, author of the book "The Body Builders: Inside the Science of the Engineered Human", about the increasingly amazing ways bioengineering is being used to reverse engineer, rebuild, and augment human beings. And we speak with Ken Thomas, spacesuit engineer and author of the book "The Journey to Moonwalking: The People That Enabled Footprints on the Moon" about...