Nav: Home

Sugary beverage consumption in US declining but remains high among certain groups

November 14, 2017

Boston, MA - Consumption of sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) fell for both children and adults between 2003 and 2014, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. But despite this positive trend, the researchers found, consumption remains high among adolescents and young adults, and is particularly high among black, Mexican American, and non-Mexican Hispanic populations.

"SSBs are a leading source of added sugar to the diet for adults and children in the U.S. and their consumption is strongly linked to obesity," said first author Sara Bleich, professor of public health policy. "Understanding which groups are most likely to consume SSBs is critical for the development of effective approaches to reduce SSB consumption."

The study will be published online November 14, 2017 in Obesity. It is the first paper to present the most recent national data on beverage consumption from the Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which is the gold standard for understanding consumption trends and patterns at a national level.

Bleich and her colleagues examined data collected from 18,600 children aged 2 to 19, and 27,652 adults aged 20 or older, in the NHANES 2003-2014. Participants were asked about their consumption of seven different beverage types in the previous 24 hours: SSBs, 100% juice, diet beverages, milk (including flavored milk), unsweetened coffee or tea, alcohol, and water.

The researchers found that overall beverage and SSB consumption declined for children and adults between 2003 and 2014. In 2013-2014, 60.7% of children and 50.0% of adults reported drinking SSBs on a given day; in 2003-2004, 79.7% of children and 61.5% of adults reported drinking SSBs. However, adolescents and young adults still consumed more than the recommended limit for added sugar set by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

While white adults experienced declines in SSB consumption across almost all age groups, there were few other significant changes for other racial and ethnic groups. SSB consumption remained highest among black, Mexican American, and non-Mexican Hispanic adolescents--groups at higher risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Higher consumption of milk (compared to SSBs) among younger children and an increasing percentage of water drinkers among children and adults were two notable positive trends.

The increase in water consumption was a positive surprise, Bleich said. "This suggests that messages about drinking non-calorie beverages are having an effect."
-end-
Other Harvard Chan School authors included Kelsey Vercammen and Zhonghe Li.

"Trends in Beverage Consumption among Children and Adults, 2003-2014," Sara N. Bleich, Kelsey A. Vercammen, Jonathan Wyatt Koma, and Zhonghe Li, Obesity, online November 14, 2017, doi: 10.1002/oby.22056

Visit the Harvard Chan School website for the latest news, press releases, and multimedia offerings.

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health brings together dedicated experts from many disciplines to educate new generations of global health leaders and produce powerful ideas that improve the lives and health of people everywhere. As a community of leading scientists, educators, and students, we work together to take innovative ideas from the laboratory to people's lives--not only making scientific breakthroughs, but also working to change individual behaviors, public policies, and health care practices. Each year, more than 400 faculty members at Harvard Chan School teach 1,000-plus full-time students from around the world and train thousands more through online and executive education courses. Founded in 1913 as the Harvard-MIT School of Health Officers, the School is recognized as America's oldest professional training program in public health.

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Related Obesity Articles:

Obesity is in the eye of the beholder
Doctors have a specific definition of what it means to be overweight or obese, but in the social world, gender, race and generation matter a lot for whether people are judged as 'thin enough' or 'too fat.'
Type 2 diabetes and obesity -- what do we really know?
Social and economic factors have led to a dramatic rise in type 2 diabetes and obesity around the world.
Three in 4 don't know obesity causes cancer
Three out of four (75 percent) people in the UK are unaware of the link between obesity and cancer, according to a new Cancer Research UK report published today.
Obesity on the rise in Indonesia
Obesity is on the rise in Indonesia, one of the largest studies of the double burden of malnutrition in children has revealed.
Obesity rates are not declining in US youth
A clear and significant increase in obesity continued from 1999 through 2014, according to an analysis of data on United States children and adolescents age 2 to 19 years.
How does the environment affect obesity?
Researchers will be examining how agricultural and food processing practices may affect brown fat activity directly or indirectly.
Obesity Day to highlight growing obesity epidemic in Europe
The growing obesity epidemic, which is predicted to affect more than half of all European citizens by 2030, will be the focus of European Obesity Day to be held on May 21.
Understanding obesity from the inside out
Researchers developed a new laboratory method that allowed them to identify GABA as a key player in the complex brain processes that control appetite and metabolism.
Epigenetic switch for obesity
Obesity can sometimes be shut down.
Immunological Aspects of Obesity
This FASEB Conference focuses on the interactions between obesity and immune cells, focusing in particular on how inflammation in various organs influences obesity and obesity-related complications.

Related Obesity Reading:

The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss
by Dr. Jason Fung (Author), Timothy Noakes (Foreword)

Obesity: Evaluation and Treatment Essentials, Second Edition
by G. Michael Steelman (Editor), Eric C. Westman (Editor)

Handbook of Obesity Treatment, Second Edition
by Thomas A. Wadden (Editor), George A. Bray (Editor)

THE OBESITY: Multiple Choice Questions Learn and Prepare
by Muhammad Asad MD Amjad Ali MD Jawaid Kalim MD Tawsufe Majid MD Saima Ashraf MD (Author), Shadab Kalim (Editor), Irtaza Asar (Editor), Hannan Chaudery (Editor), Tahreem Asad (Editor), Fatima Chawdhery (Editor), Anshaal Chawdhery (Editor), Zakariya D Ali (Editor), Noah A Ali (Editor), Asif Shakoor (Editor)

Textbook of Obesity: Biological, Psychological and Cultural Influences
by Sharon R. Akabas (Editor), Sally Ann Lederman (Editor), Barbara J. Moore (Editor)

Fat Nation: A History of Obesity in America
by Jonathan Engel (Author)

Practical Manual of Clinical Obesity
by Robert Kushner (Author)

SUMMARY: The Obesity Code by Jason Fung: unlocking the secrets of weight loss (Health and Fitness Book Summaries)
by Napoleon Hook (Author)

Practical Guide to Obesity Medicine
by Jolanta Weaver PhD FRCP CTHLE (Author)

Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease
by Avery

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Circular
We're told if the economy is growing, and if we keep producing, that's a good thing. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers explore circular systems that regenerate and re-use what we already have. Guests include economist Kate Raworth, environmental activist Tristram Stuart, landscape architect Kate Orff, entrepreneur David Katz, and graphic designer Jessi Arrington.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#504 The Art of Logic
How can mathematics help us have better arguments? This week we spend the hour with "The Art of Logic in an Illogical World" author, mathematician Eugenia Cheng, as she makes her case that the logic of mathematics can combine with emotional resonance to allow us to have better debates and arguments. Along the way we learn a lot about rigorous logic using arguments you're probably having every day, while also learning a lot about our own underlying beliefs and assumptions.