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Pregnant Asian women who develop high blood pressure at highest risk for heart failure hospitalization

November 14, 2017

ANAHEIM, California, Nov.14, 2017 -- Women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to experience heart problems within a few years of giving birth, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers from University of California San Francisco followed the time to hospitalization from heart failure (a condition when the heart can't pump well) and heart attack for nearly 1.6 million women in California. Women who experienced any form of pregnancy-related hypertension -- gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, chronic hypertension and chronic hypertension combined with preeclampsia -- were more frequently hospitalized for heart failure than women who did not experience high blood pressure during pregnancy. However, the likelihood of heart failure hospitalization depended on the patient's racial background: Black women had the lowest likelihood of heart failure hospitalization while Asian/Pacific Islander women had the highest. White and Hispanic/Latina women fell between the two groups.

Women who experienced gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension were also more likely to be hospitalized for a heart attack, but unlike with heart failure, the likelihood of hospitalization for heart attack was not influenced by racial background. The analysis demonstrates that racial background influences risk of heart failure hospitalization but not hospitalization for heart attack in women with pregnancy-related hypertension.
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Leila Y. Beach, M.D., University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine.

Note: Scientific presentation is 9:45 a.m. PT, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017.

Presentation location: 208AB (Main Building)

Additional Resources: Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke - the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation's oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

For Media Inquiries and AHA Spokesperson Perspective:

AHA News Media in Dallas: 214-706-1173

AHA News Media Office, Nov. 11-15, 2017 at the Anaheim Convention Center: 714-765-2004.

For Public Inquiries: 800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org

American Heart Association

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