Nav: Home

Surgical menopause leads to increased sleep issues

November 14, 2018

CLEVELAND, Ohio (November 14, 2018)--Insomnia is one of the most common symptoms of menopause, with nearly 20% of postmenopausal women reporting sleep disturbances. A new study from Korea demonstrates that sleep quality is often worse for women who undergo surgical menopause compared with those who transition through menopause naturally. The study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

Surgical menopause is often accompanied by more psychological and physical difficulties. The increased severity of menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats can disrupt sleep during a time in a woman's life when sleep problems are already an issue; however, only a few quantitative studies have investigated sleep-interfering behavior in postmenopausal women. This new study is one of the first to compare sleep-interfering behaviors based on type of menopause, surgical and natural.

More than 500 postmenopausal women completed questionnaires as part of the study. Women in the surgical menopause group reported significantly worse sleep quality, especially for sleep duration and habitual sleep efficiency, compared with women in the natural menopause group. In addition, women who underwent surgical menopause were found to be more than twice as likely to have insomnia. Furthermore, those women in the surgical menopause group who displayed more sleep-interfering behaviors had a higher severity of insomnia symptoms.

Results of this study are reported in the article "Sleep disturbance in women who undergo surgical menopause compared with women who experience natural menopause."

"Early surgical menopause is known to be associated with more severe menopause symptoms," says Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, NAMS executive director. "That's why it is important to assess sleep quality in women after surgery that leads to menopause, because insomnia and disrupted sleep can cause fatigue, mood changes, and lower quality of life."
-end-
For more information about menopause and healthy aging, visit http://www.menopause.org.

Founded in 1989, The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) is North America's leading nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the health and quality of life of all women during midlife and beyond through an understanding of menopause and healthy aging. Its multidisciplinary membership of 2,000 leaders in the field--including clinical and basic science experts from medicine, nursing, sociology, psychology, nutrition, anthropology, epidemiology, pharmacy, and education--makes NAMS uniquely qualified to serve as the definitive resource for health professionals and the public for accurate, unbiased information about menopause and healthy aging. To learn more about NAMS, visit http://www.menopause.org.

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

Related Menopause Articles:

Eating more vegetable protein may protect against early menopause
Results of a new study from epidemiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Harvard T.H.
Boosting communication is key in managing menopause
A University of Delaware student and faculty member have reviewed previous studies about how women manage menopause symptoms and found that they frequently use alternative treatments.
Weight loss actually possible after menopause
Talk to a woman in menopause and you're likely to hear complaints about hot flashes and an inability to lose weight, especially belly fat.
Brain changes after menopause may lead to lack of physical activity
Researchers from the University of Missouri have found a connection between lack of ovarian hormones and changes in the brain's pleasure center, a hotspot in the brain that processes and reinforces messages related to reward, pleasure, activity and motivation for physical exercise.
Does hormone therapy after menopause affect memory?
Contrary to popular belief, taking estrogen after menopause may not affect the memory and thinking abilities of healthy women no matter when the treatment is started.
More Menopause News and Menopause Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.