Can cells collected from bone marrow repair brain damage in babies with CHD?

November 14, 2019

Philadelphia, Pa. - (November 18, 2019) - An upcoming clinical trial at Children's National Hospital will harness cardiopulmonary bypass as a delivery mechanism for a novel intervention designed to stimulate brain growth and repair in children who undergo cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease.

The NIH has awarded Children's National $2.5 million to test the hypothesis that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which have been shown to possess regenerative properties and the ability to modulate immune responses in a variety of diseases, collected from allogeneic bone marrow, may promote regeneration of damaged neuronal and glial cells in the early postnatal brain. If successful, the trial will determine the safety of the proposed treatment in humans and set the stage for a Phase 2 efficacy trial of what could potentially be the first treatment for brain damage in children with congenital heart disease. The study is a single-center collaboration between three Children's National physician-researchers: Dr. Jonas, Catherine Bollard, M.B.Ch.B., M.D., and Nobuyuki Ishibashi, M.D.

Dr. Jonas, chief of cardiac surgery at Children's National, will outline the trial and its aims on Monday, November 18, 2019, at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2019. Dr. Jonas was recently recognized by the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Outcome Collaborative for his lifelong research of how cardiac surgery impacts brain growth and development in children with CHD.
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Read more about the study: Researchers receive $2.5M grant to optimize brain development in babies with CHD.

About the AHA Scientific Sessions presentation:

Regenerative Cell Therapy in Congenital Heart Disease - Protecting the Immature Brain

Presented by Richard Jonas, M.D.

Session CH.CVS.608 Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Cardiology Seminar: A Personalized Approach to Heart Disease in Children

9:50 a.m. to 10:05 a.m.

November 18, 2019

About Children's National Hospital

Children's National, based in Washington, D.C., has served the nation's children since 1870. Children's National is the nation's No. 6 pediatric hospital and, for the third straight year, is ranked No. 1 in newborn care, as well as ranked in all specialties evaluated by U.S. News & World Report. It has been designated two times as a Magnet® hospital, a designation given to hospitals that demonstrate the highest standards of nursing and patient care delivery. This pediatric academic health system offers expert care through a convenient, community-based primary care network and specialty outpatient centers in the D.C. Metropolitan area, including the Maryland suburbs and Northern Virginia. Home to the Children's Research Institute and the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National is the seventh-highest NIH-funded children's hospital in the nation. Children's National is recognized for its expertise and innovation in pediatric care and as a strong voice for children through advocacy at the local, regional and national levels.

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Children's National Hospital

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