Direct-to-patient telemedicine cardiology follow-ups may safely save families time, cost

November 14, 2019

Philadelphia - (November 17, 2019) - Health provider follow-ups delivered via computer or smartphone is a feasible alternative to in-person patient follow-ups for some pediatric cardiac conditions, according to the findings of a pilot study presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions this week.

"We've used telemedicine in pediatric cardiology for physician-to-physician communications for years at Children's National, thanks to cardiologists like Dr. Craig Sable," says Ashraf Harahsheh, M.D., cardiologist at Children's National Hospital and senior author of the study. "But this is the first time we've really had the appropriate technology to speak directly to patients and their families in their homes instead of requiring an in-person visit."

"We developed it [telemedicine] into a primary every day component of reading echocardiograms around the region and the globe," says Craig Sable, M.D., associate chief of cardiology at Children's National. "Telemedicine has enabled doctors at Children's National to extend our reach to improve the care of children and avoid unnecessary transport, family travel and lost time from work."

Participants in the virtual visit pilot study were previously established patients with hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, syncope, or who needed to discuss cardiac testing results. The retrospective sample included 18 families who met the criteria and were open to the virtual visit/telehealth follow up option between 2016 and 2019. Six months after their virtual visit, none of the participants had presented urgently with a cardiology issue. While many (39%) had additional visits with cardiology scheduled as in person, none of those subsequent in- person visits were a result of a deficiency related to the virtual visit.

"There are many more questions to be answered about how best to appropriately use technology advances that allow us to see and hear our patients without requiring them to travel a great distance," adds Dr. Harahsheh. "But my team and I were encouraged by the results of our small study, and by the anecdotal positive reviews from families who participated. We're looking forward to determining how we can successfully and cost-effectively implement these approaches as additional options for our families to get the care they need."
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The project was supported by the Research, Education, Advocacy, and Child Health Care (REACH) program within the Children's National Hospital Pediatric Residency Program.

Direct-to-Consumer Cardiology Telemedicine: A Single Large Academic Pediatric Center Experience

Aaron A. Phillips, M.D., Craig A. Sable, M.D., FAAP; Christina Waggaman, M.S.; and Ashraf S. Harahsheh, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.A.A.P.

Poster Presentation by first author Aaron Phillips, M.D., a third- year resident at Children's National CH.APS.12 - Man vs. Machine: Tech in Kids

AHA Scientific Sessions 2019

November 17, 2019

12:30 -1:00 p.m.

About Children's National Hospital

Children's National, based in Washington, D.C., has served the nation's children since 1870. Children's National is the nation's No. 6 pediatric hospital and, for the third straight year, is ranked No. 1 in newborn care, as well as ranked in all specialties evaluated by U.S. News & World Report. It has been designated two times as a Magnet® hospital, a designation given to hospitals that demonstrate the highest standards of nursing and patient care delivery. This pediatric academic health system offers expert care through a convenient, community-based primary care network and specialty outpatient centers in the D.C. Metropolitan area, including the Maryland suburbs and Northern Virginia. Home to the Children's Research Institute and the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National is the seventh-highest NIH-funded children's hospital in the nation. Children's National is recognized for its expertise and innovation in pediatric care and as a strong voice for children through advocacy at the local, regional and national levels.

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