CDC and Prevention awards Mayo Clinic an international medical education grant

November 15, 2011

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has awarded Mayo Clinic a $1.25 million grant to develop online medical education in Ethiopia. The five-year award will support Mayo Clinic and its Global HIV Education Initiative, HIV eCurriculum, to develop online education courses that disseminate best practices and recent research in HIV treatment and patient care.

The HIV eCurriculum project will be led by Zelalem Temesgen, M.D., Mayo Clinic infectious disease specialist. He will guide a team of physicians, researchers and expert faculty from Mayo Clinic as well as other U.S. institutions and local medical centers in Ethiopia.

"This is one of the first online education programs of its kind to reach Africa," says Dr. Temesgen. "It's especially groundbreaking as it addresses the need not only for core medical education, but also focuses on continuing education, something that simply doesn't exist in most African nations. But now, in seconds, a physician or nurse anywhere in Ethiopia can access training in the most recent HIV treatments relevant to their needs."

"The HIV eCurriculum project is an exceptional example of Mayo Clinic's determination to extend our resources and expertise to a global platform," says Terrence Cascino, M.D., Juanita Kious Waugh Executive Dean for Education, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic. "We have the capability to reach far beyond traditional academic walls to bring the most up-to-date education to learners in even the most remote corners of the world."

The project is also supported by Ethiopia's Federal Ministry of Health. "We are pleased to see the initiation of this important program which will provide specialized training for our physicians and nurses and stands to greatly enhance and accelerate our efforts to deliver on our key public health priorities," says Tedros Adhanom, Ph.D., Minister of Health for Ethiopia. "This is a significant contribution which will no doubt result in improved health care for scores of Ethiopians."
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Mayo Clinic

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