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Novel mapping technique targets gene therapy to hibernating heart muscle

November 15, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, November 15, 2016--Gene therapy to repair damaged heart muscle is most likely to succeed if it can be injected at the site of ischemia where there is viable myocardium with reduced contractile ability, and a new technique that combines imaging and electroanatomical mapping does just that. A study of this novel approach that shows increased blood flow in treated areas in patients with refractory angina is published in Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Human Gene Therapy website until December 15, 2016.

Seppo Ylä-Herttuala, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Eastern Finland (Kuo-pio, Finland), together with coauthors Antti Kivelä, Antti Hedman, and Juha Hartikainen, and Antti Saraste and Juhani Knuuti, from Turku University Hospital, Finland, describe their method for targeted cardiac gene transfer in the article entitled "Intramyocardial Gene Therapy Directed to Hibernating Heart Muscle Using a Combination of Electromechanical Mapping and Positron Emission Tomography."

The researchers use a combination of electromechanical mapping with a NOGA system and positron emission tomography (PET) radiowater perfusion imaging to create 2-dimensional bull's eye maps that guide the injection of the gene therapy into the heart muscle. They tar-get a site that has suffered ischemic damage, but is viable as shown by reduced contractile ability, to achieve the best possible outcome.

"Dr. Ylä-Herttualla's milestone clinical trial results demonstrate how gene therapy for heart disease can be rendered much more specific," says Editor-in-Chief Terence R. Flotte, MD, Celia and Isaac Haidak Professor of Medical Education and Dean, Provost, and Executive Deputy Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.
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About the Journal

Human Gene Therapy, the Official Journal of the European Society of Gene and Cell Therapy, British Society for Gene and Cell Therapy, French Society of Cell and Gene Therapy, German Society of Gene Therapy, and five other gene therapy societies, is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly in print and online. Led by Editor-in-Chief Terence R. Flotte, MD, Celia and Isaac Haidak Professor of Medical Education and Dean, Provost, and Executive Deputy Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Human Gene Therapy presents reports on the transfer and expression of genes in mammals, including humans. Related topics include improvements in vector development, delivery systems, and animal models, particularly in the areas of cancer, heart disease, viral disease, genetic disease, and neurological disease, as well as ethical, legal, and regulatory issues related to the gene transfer in humans. Its companion journals, Human Gene Therapy Methods, published bimonthly, focuses on the application of gene therapy to product testing and development, and Human Gene Therapy Clinical Development, published quarterly, features data relevant to the regulatory review and commercial development of cell and gene therapy products. Tables of contents for all three publications and a free sample issue may be viewed on the Human Gene Therapy website.



About the Publisher


Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Nucleic Acid Therapeutics, Tissue Engineering, Stem Cells and Development, and Cellular Reprogramming. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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Related Gene Therapy Reading:

Advanced Textbook on Gene Transfer, Gene Therapy and Genetic Pharmacology: Principles, Delivery and Pharmacological and Biomedical Applications of ... (Icp Textbooks in Biomolecular Sciences)
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The Gene: An Intimate History
by Siddhartha Mukherjee (Author)

Gene Therapy, An Issue of Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America (The Clinics: Internal Medicine)
by Daniel E. Bauer MD PhD (Author), Donald B Kohn MD (Author)

Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy
by David T. Curiel (Editor)

Gene Therapy in Neurological Disorders
by Mingjie Li (Editor), B. Joy Snider (Editor)

GUIDE TO HUMAN GENE THERAPY, A
by Roland W Herzog (Editor), Sergei Zolotukhin (Editor)

Gene and Cell Therapy: Therapeutic Mechanisms and Strategies, Fourth Edition
by Nancy Smyth Templeton (Editor)

The Gene Therapy Plan: Taking Control of Your Genetic Destiny with Diet and Lifestyle
by Mitchell L. Gaynor MD (Author), Mehmet C. Oz M.D. (Foreword)

Gene therapy
by The Open University

Translating Gene Therapy to the Clinic: Techniques and Approaches
by Jeffrey Laurence (Editor), Michael Franklin (Editor)

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