Nav: Home

Patchy distribution of joint inflammation resolved

November 15, 2018

Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondylo-arthritis (SpA) are chronic disabling diseases that have a poor outcome on loco-motoric function, if left untreated. RA en SpA affect each about 1% of the population. The reason why certain joints are more affected than others has been a longstanding question, resolved by Isabelle Cambré and Prof. Dirk Elewaut from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research who published their results in Nature Communications

They found that biomechanical forces are key drivers behind this observation. By studying the inflammation induced bone erosions in detail they identified certain hot spots in the musculoskeletal system where joint inflammation and erosions are more likely to occur. These sites are especially sensitive to mechanical loading and explain the clinical pattern of joint involvement described in human patients.

The team also discovered the underlying mechanisms, which involves release of certain inflammatory mediators, like chemokines, by joint resident cells in response to mechanical stress. This in turn leads to recruitment of certain white blood subsets, classical monocytes, into mechanically stressed regions where they mediate inflammation and subsequently tissue damage such as erosions.

Isabelle Cambré (VIB-UGent): "Our results explain to a large degree the patchy nature of joint inflammation in human arthritis and the clinical pattern of joint involvement." We are currently trying to unravel the underlying pathways driving this inflammation: we are excited about this as this is potentially a new area of research at the intersection of mechanobiology and inflammation.
-end-
Publication

Mechanical strain determines the site-specific localization of inflammation and tissue damage in arthritis, Cambré et al., Nature Communications 2018

Questions from patients

A breakthrough in research is not the same as a breakthrough in medicine. The realizations of VIB researchers can form the basis of new therapies, but the development path still takes years. This can raise a lot of questions. That is why we ask you to please refer questions in your report or article to the email address that VIB makes available for this purpose: patienteninfo@vib.be">patienteninfo@vib.be. Everyone can submit questions concerning this and other medically-oriented research directly to VIB via this address.

Funding

Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek-Vlaanderen (FWO), Fonds voor Wetenschappelijk Reuma Onderzoek (FWRO)

VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)

Related Rheumatoid Arthritis Articles:

New pieces added to the molecular puzzle of rheumatoid arthritis
researchers have revealed new details about how joint inflammation evolves in rheumatoid arthritis, and the cells that prolong the inflammatory attack.
Thermal cameras effective in detecting rheumatoid arthritis
A new study, published today in Scientific Reports, highlights that thermal imaging has the potential to become an important method to assess Rheumatoid Arthritis.
Rheumatoid arthritis -- can its onset be delayed or prevented?
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder that leads to significant health issues as well as high treatment costs.
Disease burden in osteoarthritis is similar to rheumatoid arthritis
Osteoarthritis (OA) has traditionally been viewed as a highly prevalent but milder condition when compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and some may believe that it is part of a normal aging process requiring acceptance, not treatment.
Prospect of a new treatment for rheumatoid arthritis
An international research group led by Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin has completed testing a new drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis.
Can rare lymphocytes combat rheumatoid arthritis?
Immunologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have demonstrated that ILC2, a group of rare lymphoid cells, play a key role in the development of inflammatory arthritis.
How environmental pollutants and genetics work together in rheumatoid arthritis
New research documents how chemicals and a certain gene activate an enzyme to increase the risk and severity of RA and bone destruction.
Rheumatoid arthritis meets precision medicine
Scientists are bringing precision medicine to rheumatoid arthritis for the first time by using genetic profiling of joint tissue to see which drugs will work for which patients, reports a new multi-site study.
Causes of death in rheumatoid arthritis patients
Mortality rates were increased for patients with rheumatoid arthritis relative to the general population across all causes of death in a recent Arthritis Care & Research analysis.
Menopause found to worsen symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
A recent study published in Rheumatology suggests that women with rheumatoid arthritis suffer a greater decline in physical function following menopause.
More Rheumatoid Arthritis News and Rheumatoid Arthritis Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.