Nav: Home

Recent study documents damage to rice crops by three fall-applied residual herbicides

November 15, 2018

WESTMINSTER, Colorado - November 15, 2018 - Fall-applied residual herbicides are a commonly used control for glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass - one of the most troublesome weeds in Mid-South row crops. But research published in the journal Weed Technology shows rice growers need to be cautious. Some residual herbicides can have a negative impact on rice crop performance.

The warning follows field studies conducted in Stoneville, Mississippi, where rice is frequently planted in rotation with soybean, grain sorghum, and cotton. Researchers made fall applications of clomazone, pyroxasulfone, S-metolachlor, and trifluralin to determine their impact on subsequent rice growth and yields.

Each herbicide was applied at both the suggested use rate and at two times the suggested use rate to see whether their persistence in the soil would negatively influence rice planted during the following growing season.

Fourteen days after rice crop emergence, scientists found that pyroxasulfone, S-metolachlor, and trifluralin had produced greater injury to plants than clomazone, regardless of the application rate. The same was true for rice seedling density, height, and maturity.

"Among the herbicides in our study, only clomazone should be used as a fall-applied residual herbicide to target glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass prior to seeding rice crops," says Jason Bond of Mississippi State University.
-end-
Full text of the article, "Effect of Fall-applied Residual Herbicides on Rice Growth and Yield" is now available in Weed Technology Vol. 32, Issue 5.

About Weed Technology


Weed Technology is a journal of the Weed Science Society of America, a nonprofit scientific society focused on weeds and their impact on the environment. The publication presents original research and special articles about weeds, crops and new technologies used for more effective weed management. To learn more, visit http://www.wssa.net.

Cambridge University Press

Related Rice Articles:

New rice fights off drought
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have developed strains of rice that are resistant to drought in real-world situations.
Domesticated rice goes rogue
We tend to assume that domestication is a one-way street and that, once domesticated, crop plants stay domesticated.
Protecting rice crops at no extra cost
A newly identified genetic mechanism in rice can be utilized to maintain resistance to a devastating disease, without causing the typical tradeoff -- a decrease in grain yield, a new study reports.
Every grain of rice: Ancient rice DNA data provides new view of domestication history
Now, using new data collected samples of ancient, carbonized rice, a team of Japanese and Chinese scientists have successfully determined DNA sequences to make the first comparisons between modern and ancient rice.
Four newly identified genes could improve rice
A Japanese research team have applied a method used in human genetic analysis to rice and rapidly discovered four new genes that are potentially significant for agriculture.
Infants who ate rice, rice products had higher urinary concentrations of arsenic
Although rice and rice products are typical first foods for infants, a new study found that infants who ate rice and rice products had higher urinary arsenic concentrations than those who did not consume any type of rice, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
New resource for managing the Mexican rice borer
A new article in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management provides information on the biology and life cycle of the Mexican rice borer (Eoreuma loftini), and offers suggestions about how to manage them.
Fighting rice fungus
Plant scientists are uncovering more clues critical to disarming a fungus that leads to rice blast disease and devastating crop losses.
The origin and spread of 'Emperor's rice'
Black rice was prized in ancient times for its color and is prized in modern times for its high levels of antioxidants, but its early history has been shrouded in mystery until now.
Trigger found for defense to rice disease
Biologists have discovered how the rice plant's immune system is triggered by disease, in a discovery that could boost crop yields and lead to more disease-resistant types of rice.

Related Rice Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...