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Opioid overdose deaths among younger medicare patients with disability

November 15, 2019

Bottom Line: This observational study estimated the rate of opioid overdose deaths among Medicare enrollees younger than 65 who qualified for Medicare because of a disability. The study included more than 1.7 million of these enrollees in 2016 and 1,371 opioid overdose deaths. Researchers report those enrollees represented 14.9% of the Medicare population but they accounted for almost 81% of all opioid overdose deaths among all Medicare enrollees. The rate of opioid overdose deaths in this population increased from 57.4 per 100,000 in 2012 to 77.6 per 100,000 in 2016, and was greater among people with psychiatric diseases (such as depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder), substance use disorder (tobacco, alcohol or drug use) and chronic pain. Adults who had all three of these conditions had higher rate of opioid overdose death than those with none of the conditions. Limitations of the study include variations in the quality and accuracy of death certificate data associated with overdose.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

Authors: Yong-Fang Kuo, Ph.D., of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, and coauthors.

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.15638)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-
Media advisory: To contact corresponding author Yong-Fang Kuo, Ph.D., email Christopher Smith Gonzalez at chrissmi@utmb.edu. The full study is linked to this news release.

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About JAMA Network Open: JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. Every Wednesday and Friday, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.

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