Nav: Home

Jefferson researchers find drug may give some cardiac protection 24 hours after heart attack

November 16, 2005

A drug has been shown to provide some protection to the heart from injury even if given as much as 24 hours after a heart attack, Jefferson Medical College researchers report. Walter Koch, Ph.D., director of the Center for Translational Medicine in the Department of Medicine at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, and his co-workers knew that the drug Darbepoietin alpha would protect the ischemic heart. Darbepoietin is a long-acting cousin of erythropoietin (EPO), which has been shown to offer some protection to the heart from injury from ischemia, or a lack of oxygen. In previous studies, Dr. Koch had given EPO at the time of simulated heart attack in an another animal model, and found it protected the animals.

But in further studies, Dr. Koch gave Darbepoietin to animals at the time of ischemia and heart attack, one to two hours after, and 24 hours later. In each case, the scientists saw that the drug offered significant protection to heart tissue, and even helped improve cardiac function. Dr. Koch believes the results "may be quickly translated into clinical trials." He and his team present their findings on November 16, 2005 at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2005 in Dallas.
-end-
Editors: This information is embargoed for release on Wednesday, Nov. 16 at 3 p.m. at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2005 in Dallas.

Thomas Jefferson University

Related Heart Attack Articles:

Heart cells respond to heart attack and increase the chance of survival
The heart of humans and mice does not completely recover after a heart attack.
A simple method to improve heart-attack repair using stem cell-derived heart muscle cells
The heart cannot regenerate muscle after a heart attack, and this can lead to lethal heart failure.
Mount Sinai discovers placental stem cells that can regenerate heart after heart attack
Study identifies new stem cell type that can significantly improve cardiac function.
Fixing a broken heart: Exploring new ways to heal damage after a heart attack
The days immediately following a heart attack are critical for survivors' longevity and long-term healing of tissue.
Heart patch could limit muscle damage in heart attack aftermath
Guided by computer simulations, an international team of researchers has developed an adhesive patch that can provide support for damaged heart tissue, potentially reducing the stretching of heart muscle that's common after a heart attack.
More Heart Attack News and Heart Attack Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...