Rusk experts present at American Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation meeting

November 16, 2011

Experts from Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center will present research and clinical insight into complex medical rehabilitation, the treatment of traumatic brain injuries and the integration of handheld technologies into practice management at the American Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AAPM&R) Annual Meeting in Orlando, November 17-20, 2011. Experts will be available to comment about advances in rehabilitation medicine. Presentations include:

*Personalized Medicine as a Driver of Neuromuscular Care: Changing the Landscape by Tailoring Diagnostics and Treatment to the Individual Patient*
Friday, November 18 at 1:15 PM
Jeffrey Cohen, MD, Doug Elwood, MD and Swati Sathe, MD
This discussion will highlight how personalized medicine - the use of genomic analysis to create individualized treatments for a patient and not just targeting the disease - has revolutionized health care delivery and is now changing how physicians diagnose and manage genetic neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy and Pompe disease.

*TBI: Aging With a Chronic Disease*
Saturday, November 19 at 1:30 PM
Steven Flanagan, MD
This discussion offers rationale for treating traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a chronic disease with long-lasting medical problems requiring lifelong follow-up. Patients who suffer a TBI often exhaust the limited health care resources in the period soon after the initial injury - resulting in inadequate long-term care.

*Using Advances in Technology to Improve Practice Management and Patient Care: Opportunities and Case Study*
Saturday, November 19 at 3:15 PM
Jeffrey Cohen, MD, Doug Elwood, MD and Jeffrey Heckman, DO
This presentation will highlight the integration of smartphones and tablet computers in a health care practice, discuss attitudes towards adoption of these tools by physiatrists and discuss a pilot of inpatient and outpatient management approaches to improve services for patients with limb loss.

*Update on the Diagnosis of Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Pelvic Girdle Pain in Men and Women: And Underrepresented Condition of Musculoskeletal Medicine*
Sunday, November 20 at 8:00 AM
Jaclyn Bonder, MD
This presentation will highlight techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction and pain syndromes of the pelvic girdle region, which can cause significant decline in quality of life and loss of function.

*Brain Injury Fatigue: State of the Science*
Sunday, November 20 at 9:45 AM
Tamara Bushnik, PhD and Steven Flanagan, MD
This presentation will discuss fatigue in brain injury, one of the most common complaints among patients suffering from this condition, and other disease states, including recent advances in research, physiology, potential comorbidities and clinical associations established through functional neuroimaging.
-end-
The Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine is the world's first university-affiliated facility devoted entirely to rehabilitation medicine and has been voted the best rehabilitation hospital in New York, and among the top ten in the country, by U.S. News & World Report for the last 22 years. You can learn more at http://rusk.med.nyu.edu/.

About NYU Langone Medical Center

NYU Langone Medical Center, a world-class patient-centered integrated academic medical center, is one of the nation's premier centers for excellence in health care, biomedical research, and medical education. Located in the heart of Manhattan, NYU Langone is comprised of three hospitals - Tisch Hospital, a 705-bed acute-care tertiary facility, Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, the first rehabilitation hospital in the world, with 174 beds and extensive outpatient rehabilitation programs, and the 190-bed Hospital for Joint Diseases, one of only five hospitals in the world dedicated to orthopaedics and rheumatology - plus the NYU School of Medicine, one of the nation's preeminent academic institutions. For more information visit www.NYULMC.org.

NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Related Brain Injury Articles from Brightsurf:

Using machine learning to predict pediatric brain injury
When newborn babies or children with heart or lung distress are struggling to survive, doctors often turn to a form of life support that uses artificial lungs.

A memory game could help us understand brain injury
A Boston University team created a memory game for mice in order to examine the function of two different brain areas that process information about the sensation of touch and the memory of previous events.

Clear signs of brain injury with severe COVID-19
Certain patients who receive hospital care for coronavirus infection (COVID-19) exhibit clinical and neurochemical signs of brain injury, a University of Gothenburg study shows.

Reducing dangerous swelling in traumatic brain injury
After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), the most harmful damage is caused by secondary swelling of the brain compressed inside the skull.

Can brain injury from boxing, MMA be measured?
For boxers and mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters, is there a safe level of exposure to head trauma?

Study: Brain injury common in domestic violence
Domestic violence survivors commonly suffer repeated blows to the head and strangulation, trauma that has lasting effects that should be widely recognized by advocates, health care providers, law enforcement and others who are in a position to help, according to the authors of a new study.

Which car crashes cause traumatic brain injury?
Motor vehicle crashes are one of the most common causes of TBI-related emergency room visits, hospitalizations and deaths.

Landmark study reveals no benefit to costly and risky brain cooling after brain injury
A landmark study, led by Monash University researchers, has definitively found that the practice of cooling the body and brain in patients who have recently received a severe traumatic brain injury, has no impact on the patient's long-term outcome.

Every cell has a story to tell in brain injury
Traumatic head injury can have widespread effects in the brain, but now scientists can look in real time at how head injury affects thousands of individual cells and genes simultaneously in mice.

Traumatic brain injury recovery via petri dish
Researchers in the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center have succeeded in reproducing the effects of traumatic brain injury and stimulating recovery in neuron cells grown in a petri dish.

Read More: Brain Injury News and Brain Injury Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.