Professor Doug Hilton wins Research Australia Award

November 16, 2011

Medical researcher and director of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Professor Doug Hilton, has tonight received the 2011 Research Australia Leadership and Innovation Award.

The award recognises Professor Hilton's achievements as a medical researcher, as well as his leadership in promoting the value of health and medical research to the Australian community.

Professor Hilton's scientific career has focussed on the control of blood formation. His research at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute has revealed many molecules that are important for blood formation and signalling between cells.

In 2009 Professor Hilton became the sixth director of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and head of the Department of Medical Biology at The University of Melbourne. His priorities in this role have been to continue the institute's research strengths in cancer, infectious diseases and immune disorders, and to enhance the translation of institute research into improvements in health care.

In early 2011, Professor Hilton initiated the 'Discoveries Need Dollars: Protect Medical Research' campaign in response to indications that cuts to medical research funding were planned in the 2011-2012 Federal Budget. The campaign roused strong support for maintenance of medical research funding from the community, culminating in thousands of Australians attending 'Rallies for Research' in April. Ultimately the medical research budget was maintained, which many attribute to Professor Hilton's leadership in the campaign.

Professor Moira Clay, director of academic and research services at the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Perth, and a vocal participant in the Discoveries Need Dollars campaign, said Professor Hilton was instrumental to the campaign's success. "Doug developed strategies to reach many sectors of the community," she said. "The success of the campaign was that it gained support from thousands of people, not only within the medical research community, but also from patients and their families, and even the wider community. Politicians received a loud and strong message that Australians value public funding of medical research."

Professor Arthur Shulkes, the associate dean (research) of The University of Melbourne's Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, said he was delighted to learn of Research Australia's award to Professor Hilton. "Doug exemplifies what can be accomplished with true leadership and innovation ranging from his stellar research achievements to his passionate support for the Discoveries Need Dollars campaign," Professor Shulkes said.

Professor Hilton said he felt humbled to be honoured by his peers. "I would like to pay tribute to all those Australians, scientists or otherwise, who value the richness research brings to a society and who are willing to stand up to see it protected," Professor Hilton said. "I look forward to the day where Australian children with an enthusiasm for science and a curiosity about the world can choose a career in science knowing they will be respected and well remunerated."

Professor Hilton has received many awards in his career including the Australian Academy of Science's Gottschalk Medal, the Australian Institute of Political Science's 'Tall Poppy' award, the Commonwealth Health Minister's Award for Excellence in Health and Medical Research, and the Seymour & Vivian Milstein Award for Excellence in Interferon and Cytokine Research. He was named one of Australia's 'Top 10 Scientific Minds Under 45' by Cosmos magazine in 2006, and one of The Age Melbourne Magazine's 'Top 100 People' in 2009.
-end-


Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Related Leadership Articles from Brightsurf:

Women in leadership positions face more sexual harassment
Power in the workplace does not stop women's exposure to sexual harassment.

Collective leadership groups maintain cohesion and act decisively
Members of collective leadership groups can maintain cohesion and act decisively when faced with a crisis, in spite of lacking the formal authority to do so, according to new research from Cass Business School.

Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish
Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows.

Rice study assesses college leadership training programs
A new study from psychologists at Rice University found they teach students about leadership, but additional measures are needed to evaluate how they impact students' real-life leadership skills.

These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership
Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees.

Preventing toxic work environments through ethical leadership
Recently published research from SDSU management professor, Dr. Gabi Eissa and University of Wisconsin -- Eau Claire management professor, Dr.

Women, your inner circle may be key to gaining leadership roles
According to a new Notre Dame study, women who communicate regularly with a female-dominated inner circle are more likely to attain high-ranking leadership positions.

Feminine leadership traits: Nice but expendable frills?
The first study to examine tradeoffs in masculine versus feminine leadership traits reveals that stereotypically feminine traits -- like being tolerant and cooperative -- are viewed as desirable but ultimately superfluous add-ons.

Leadership and adaptive reserve are not associated with blood pressure control
Primary care leadership and practice resilience can strengthen organizational culture.

Values and gender shape young adults' entrepreneurial and leadership
Young adults who are driven by extrinsic rewards and money and less by a sense of security are more likely to want to become entrepreneurs and leaders, according to a recent study.

Read More: Leadership News and Leadership Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.