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New international recognition for professor Federico Rosei

November 16, 2016

Professor Federico Rosei, who is also the director of the INRS Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Center, has been elected a member of the World Academy of Art and Science for his outstanding contribution to scientific research and technological innovation in the synthesis and characterization of multifunctional materials and their integration in devices. He is the first INRS professor to join this prestigious academy, which includes numerous Nobel laureates and only about twenty Canadians.

Professor Rosei is actively involved in partnerships with emerging countries, notably in the framework of the UNESCO Chair in Materials and Technology for Energy Conversion, Saving, and Storage which he established at INRS in 2014. The work carried out by his team has resulted in major scientific breakthroughs leading to the development of innovative applications in a variety of sectors: green energy, electronics, and life sciences, and has opened the door to a new generation of solar cells.

Laureate of the Canadian Society for Chemistry's 2016 John C. Polanyi Award, Professor Rosei has achieved ample international peer recognition, as shown by the many awards and distinctions he has earned in recent years, from Australia, China, Iran, Japan, the United States, and Europe.
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About the World Academy of Art and Science

The World Academy of Art and Science is an international organization founded in 1960. It brings together more than 700 members from various cultures, nationalities, and intellectual disciplines, chosen for their distinction in the arts or natural, social, and human sciences. The Academy seeks to contribute to the progress of global civilization, the welfare of populations, the sustainable development of the planet, and the enhancement of world order and peace. These issues are related to the social consequences and policy implications of knowledge, which are the main focus of the discussions held by this think tank that promotes the ethical application of scientific discoveries.

Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS

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