Louisiana Tech University professor elected to National Academy of Construction

November 16, 2016

RUSTON, La. - Dr. Tom Iseley, professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology and director of the Trenchless Technology Center at Louisiana Tech University, has been elected to the Class of 2016 of the National Academy of Construction (NAC).

Iseley was one of 30 new members elected to the Academy from a pool of over 300 national candidates who participated in the rigorous nomination and election process. He was officially inducted during the NAC Annual Meeting in Napa, California in October.

"I am honored to have been selected for such a prestigious organization representing the construction industry leadership," Iseley said. "This has such a special meaning since I was born into an underground utility construction family. I am grateful that my contributions for advancing the trenchless industry were recognized. These contributions resulted from the efforts of many colleagues, mentors, students and others."

The NAC says that Iseley has been on the cutting edge of trenchless technology since its inception more than 30 years ago. Widely experienced in both industry and academia, he has been a construction company owner, a consultant, a staff engineer, an engineering vice president, a chief technical officer, and a president and COO of a privately held company.

"The new members of the National Academy of Construction represent the best of the best of those who have distinguished themselves through stellar careers and contributions to the engineering and construction industry," said Wayne Crew, General Secretary of the NAC. "Our mission is to recognize these leaders and to share the academy's reservoir of expertise in all facets of the built environment in service to our nation."

During his nearly 40 year career in the planning, design and construction of underground infrastructure systems, Iseley has served on the faculty of several universities and is a founding director of the North American Society for Trenchless Technology (NASTT). Iseley also served for three years as the chairman of the National Utility Contractors Association's (NUCA) Trenchless Technology Committee.

At Louisiana Tech, Iseley helped establish the Trenchless Technology Center, an innovative and internationally renowned research center that is at the forefront of trenchless technology research, and the Buried Asset Management Institute-International, a non-profit, international corporation that evaluates and develops buried asset management protocols for underground water infrastructure.

In April 2015, Iseley was selected as a Distinguished Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) for his eminence in engineering, becoming just one of only 637 Distinguished Members ever selected by the ASCE. He was also selected a 2016 UCTA MVP (Most Valuable Professional) by the Underground Construction Technology Association (UCTA) and Underground Construction magazine.

The National Academy of Construction, established in 1999, is an organization of industry leaders including construction users, engineers, designers, constructors, consultants, attorneys, sureties, and academicians, who have made outstanding contributions to the engineering and construction industry. In addition to being a personal honor, election to the Academy allows members to volunteer their expertise to a variety of organizations, governmental and nongovernmental, for the betterment of the industry as a whole.
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Louisiana Tech University

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