'K computer' research results awarded ACM Gordon Bell Prize

November 17, 2011

Tokyo and Tsukuba, Japan, November 18, 2011 - A research group from RIKEN, the University of Tsukuba, the University of Tokyo, and Fujitsu Limited today announced that research results obtained using the "K computer" were awarded the ACM Gordon Bell Prize, Peak-Performance at SC11, the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis taking place in Seattle, on November 17 (US Pacific Standard Time).

The award-winning results, presented at SC11, revealed the electron states of silicon nanowires, which have attracted attention as a core material for next-generation semiconductors. To verify the computational performance of the K computer, quantum-mechanical computations were performed on the electron states of a nanowire with approximately 100,000 atoms (20 nanometers in diameter and 6 nanometers long), close to the actual size of the materials, and achieved execution performance of 3.08 petaflops (representing execution efficiency of 43.6%). The results of the detailed calculations on the electron states of silicon nanowires, comprised of 10,000 to 40,000 atoms, clarified that electron transport characteristics will change depending on the cross-sectional shape of the nanowire.

The award marked the first time that a research group from Japan won the Gordon Bell Prize for Peak-Performance since 2004, when a team led by Professor Akira Kageyama, currently based at Kobe University, won the prize for performing a simulation of a geomagnetic dynamo using the first-generation Earth Simulator installed at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC).

The application used in this current research is one of the core applications developed as part of the "Grand Challenges" program (which, in the field of nanotechnology, is led by the Institute for Molecular Science at Japan's National Institute of Natural Sciences) of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT).

The K computer was recently recognized for the second time as the world's most powerful supercomputer, rating at 10.51 petaflops on the Linpack benchmark.
-end-


RIKEN

Related Atoms Articles from Brightsurf:

How to gently caress atoms
It is extremely difficult to study oxygen molecules on the metal oxide surface without altering them.

'Hot and messy' entanglement of 15 trillion atoms
In a study published in Nature Communications, ICFO, HDU and UPV researchers report the production of a giant entangled state that may help medical researchers detect extremely faint magnetic signals from the brain.

Exciting apparatus helps atoms see the light
Researchers in the Light-Matter Interactions for Quantum Technologies Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have generated Rydberg atoms - unusually large excited atoms - near nanometer-thin optical fibers.

Manipulating atoms to make better superconductors
A new study by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers published in the journal Nature Communications shows that it is possible to manipulate individual atoms so that they begin working in a collective pattern that has the potential to become superconducting at higher temperatures.

Grabbing atoms
In a first for quantum physics, University of Otago researchers have 'held' individual atoms in place and observed previously unseen complex atomic interactions.

Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate
Organic molecules with atoms of the semi-metal boron are important building blocks for synthesis products to produce drugs and agricultural chemicals.

2D materials: arrangement of atoms measured in silicene
Silicene consists of a single layer of silicon atoms. In contrast to the ultra-flat material graphene, which is made of carbon, silicene shows surface irregularities that influence its electronic properties.

Atoms don't like jumping rope
Nanooptical traps are a promising building block for quantum technologies.

2000 atoms in two places at once
The quantum superposition principle has been tested on a scale as never before in a new study by scientists at the University of Vienna.

Single atoms as catalysts
Only the outermost layer of a catalyst can play a role in chemical reactions.

Read More: Atoms News and Atoms Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.