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Do vitamin supplements actually work? (video)

November 17, 2015

WASHINGTON, Nov. 17, 2015 -- You've seen them in late night commercials and at your local pharmacy--little pills that claim to cure your cold, help you wake up or maybe help you lose weight. Vitamin and mineral supplements are everywhere and generate billions of dollars in revenue in the U.S. each year. But do they really work? Find out in this week's Reactions video: https://youtu.be/9gQoG0AT3kY.
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