Program may help increase numbers of live kidney donors

November 17, 2016

Highlights Chicago, IL (November 17, 2016) -- A new program may help overcome common barriers to finding living kidney donors. The program will be highlighted at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15¬-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL.

Boosting organ donations from living donors would help reduce the shortage of organs for transplantation. In the Live Donor Champion program, each wait-listed patient identifies a person to be their Live Donor Champion--a friend, family member, or community member willing to advocate for the patient. Clinicians provide both the patient and the Live Donor Champion with educational materials, business cards, and other resources.

Elizabeth King, MD, PhD (Johns Hopkins University), and her colleagues conducted a study that included 163 adult kidney transplant candidates who participated in the program. Participating individuals left with increased knowledge of live donation and comfort approaching others about live donation. The program also boosted live donor referrals: there were a total of 81 live donor referrals, and participation in the program was associated with a 5.5-fold increase in having at least 1 donor referral compared with matched controls on the waiting list.

"Our results suggest that the Live Donor Champion may ultimately help wait-listed patients identify potential live donors," said Dr. King.
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Study: "The Live Donor Champion Program: A Novel Approach to Identifying Live Kidney Donors" (Abstract Number 6048)

ASN Kidney Week 2016, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2016 will take place November 15-20, 2016 in Chicago, IL.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has nearly 16,000 members representing 112 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.asn-online.org or contact us at 202-640-4660.

American Society of Nephrology

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