Nav: Home

Bridging approach to regulation needed to keep to e-cigarette innovations coming

November 17, 2016

A regulatory mechanism that allows for a bridging approach between different variants of e-cigarettes and other next generation products is required to maintain the rate of breakthrough innovations.

'Despite their short history, products like electronic cigarettes have gone through many changes and can now be categorized in multiple generations,' Dr James Murphy, Head of Reduced Risk Substantiation at British American Tobacco said today. But, he said, 'The many innovations and technological breakthroughs that allow for this rate of development are so rapid that it is impractical to create complete new data sets every time a product is tweaked. This would drastically impact the innovation process, the availability of new and improved products and their value as a public health tool,' he said.

Murphy was giving a keynote speech today at the at the Next Generation Nicotine Delivery conference in London.

Murphy said that although a complete data set should be required for the initial product, a reduced number of key studies should be sufficient for subsequent novel product variants.

He described the tests that could be used to help create the foundational datasets for the initial product - These tests could focus on, for example, measuring toxicants in the vapour; the impact of the vapour on lung cells and other cells in biological tests compared to cigarette smoke, ensuring that the product remains stable over time and that consumers are not likely to use more of the newer product.

'Once you build the initial science package, a reduced number of tests should be sufficient to support subsequent product tweaks, Murphy said. 'A smaller number of more focused tests could then be developed to assess product variants compared to the original product.'

'Manufacturers should be able to provide useful data to support their products,' Murphy argued adding that 'this could have multiple benefits in minimising the use of human subjects; developing efficient, intelligent testing strategies; reducing the burden on the regulator and enabling a more efficient route for the assessment of these products to realise their potential of reducing risk.'

Many in the public health community believe that e-cigarettes represent an historic opportunity to save millions of lives and drastically reduce the public health burden of smoking-related diseases. Public Health England, an executive body of the UK Department of Health, recently published a report saying that the current expert estimate is that using e-cigarettes is around 95% safer than smoking cigarettes, although more research is needed. The Royal College of Physicians have said that the public can be reassured that e-cigarettes are much safer then smoking and that they should be widely promoted as an alternative to conventional cigarettes.
-end-


R&D at British American Tobacco

Related Cigarettes Articles:

E-cigarettes potentially as harmful as tobacco cigarettes, UConn study shows
UConn study shows nicotine-based e-cigarettes are potentially as harmful as unfiltered cigarettes when it comes to causing DNA damage.
E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes, PATH study shows
People who regularly use electronic cigarettes are less dependent on their product than those who regularly use traditional cigarettes, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
E-cigarettes do not promote cancer growth in lab tests
A new study found no evidence that a commercially available e-cigarette vapor promotes the development of cancer in laboratory cells.
For young adults, cigarettes more pleasurable with alcohol than with pot
Young adults get more pleasure from smoking cigarettes while they are drinking alcohol than they do while using marijuana, according to a new UC San Francisco study.
E-cigarettes a gateway to smoking? Not likely, according to new published research
Major national studies provide little evidence that e-cigarette users move to smoking cigarettes as a result, researchers from University at Buffalo, University of Michigan write.
E-cigarettes popular among smokers with existing illnesses
In the US more than 16 million people with smoking-related illnesses continue to use cigarettes.
E-cigarettes safer than smoking says long-term study
E-cigarettes are less toxic and safer to use compared to conventional cigarettes, according to research.
Study adds to evidence that electronic cigarettes are not harmless
A study published in JAMA Cardiology has added to growing evidence that electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are not harmless.
E-cigarettes are expanding tobacco product use among youth
E-cigarettes are actually attracting a new population of adolescents who might not otherwise have smoked tobacco products, according to a new UC San Francisco study.
Fewer see e-cigarettes as less harmful than cigarettes
The perception that e-cigarettes are less harmful than regular cigarettes fell between 2012 and 2014, a sign that fewer people see them as a safe alternative to smoking tobacco, a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests.

Related Cigarettes Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".