Residential design for persons with neurological disability

November 18, 2009

Amsterdam, November 18, 2009 - IOS Press announces the November 2009 publication of a special issue of NeuroRehabilitation: An International Journal devoted to residential design for persons with neurodisability. While there is clearly agreement that the nature of the long-term living environment can improve quality of life and minimize safety risks for individuals who are cognitively, behaviorally and/or physically challenged due to neurodisability, residential design factors are often either ignored or minimally considered. This unique issue calls attention to the important topic of community-based residential designs for persons with neurodisabilities by presenting a compendium of cutting edge design perspectives, insights and practical information not available elsewhere.

Guest Editor Nathan Zasler, MD, FAAPM&R, FACRM, CBIST, who is CEO and Medical Director of Tree of Life Services, Inc and Concussion Care Centre of Virginia, Ltd., Richmond, VA, has assembled a diverse group of contributors including some of the top experts in residential design for persons with disabilities.

Dr. Zasler comments, "I took on this special issue of the journal because I felt it was a very important topic of post acute management of persons with neurodisability regardless of the underlying cause. The field of design for persons with disability-related challenges was important to me professionally because of the lack of adequate resources dealing with architectural design issues. Hopefully, this issue of NeuroRehabilitation will serve as a commonly referenced source for architects involved in building design for persons with these types of challenges."

The issue focuses on how design planning should reinforce the need to view individuals holistically, as well as functionally, and try as much as possible to individualize design modifications to optimize both home and community reentry.

Dr. Margaret Caukins of Innovative Designs and Environments for an Aging Society provides an insightful review of the evidence-based literature on long-term care design. Dr. Sharon Joines from the North Carolina State University, College of Design, has written an overview dealing with the concept of universal design and its application to residential design for persons with neurological disability. Professors Victor Regneir and Alexis Denton from the Architectural and Gerontology Department of the University of Southern California contribute an article on new and emerging building trends that focuses on European models of design. The topic of lighting design is explored by Elizabeth Brawley of Design Concepts Unlimited, Sausalito, CA.

Dr. Sherril York from the National Center on Accessibility at Indiana University shares her architectural views on outdoor design relative to accessibility related issues. Dr. Tony Gentry, OTR/L has contributed an article dealing with "smart homes" which provides a state-of-the-art look at some of the technology currently available to facilitate independence in community based residential settings. Lastly, Laura Kiser, OTR/L and Dr. Zasler provide an overview of practical residential design recommendations for persons with acquired brain injury (ABI). The issue also includes a listing of extensive web-based resources that provide further information to facilitate design decisions and their implementation.

"This special thematic issue of NeuroRehabilitation on residential design serves as a 'one-stop' resource for individuals interested in serving the housing needs of persons with neurodisability and/or for those making modifications to their own home..." stated Dr. Zasler. Because of the importance of this issue, IOS Press has made its content available at no cost at: http://iospress.metapress.com/content/w73627vu76q2/?p=feba6288943942a982f6a0a2e0082e61&pi=0
-end-
Rehabilitation Design
Guest Editor: Nathan Zasler, MD, FAAPM&R, FACRM
Tree of Life Services, Richmond, VA USA; Concussion Care Centre of VA, Richmond, VA USA

NeuroRehabilitation, Volume 25, Issue 3 (November 2009)
Published by IOS Press

Table of Contents

Rehabilitation design (guest editorial)
Nathan Zasler

Evidence-based long term care design
Margaret P. Calkins

Enhancing quality of life through Universal Design
Sharon Joines

Ten new and emerging trends in residential group living environments
Victor Regnier and Alexis Denton

Enriching lighting design
Elizabeth C. Brawley

Residential design and outdoor area accessibility
Sherril L. York

Smart homes for people with neurological disability: State of the art
Tony Gentry

Residential design for real life rehabilitation
Laura Kiser and Nathan Zasler

IOS Press

Related Life Articles from Brightsurf:

Life at its limits
A new study led by James Bradley of the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ and Queen Mary University of London finds that microbes in the seabed survive on far less energy than has been shown ever before.

Antibiotics use early in life increases risk of inflammatory bowel disease later in life
Even short, single antibiotic courses given to young animals can predispose them to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) when they are older, according to Rutgers researchers.

When you're 84...What should life look like as we age?
What will your life look like when you're 84? When a health system leader put that question to Lewis A.

Discovery of life in solid rock deep beneath sea may inspire new search for life on Mars
Newly discovered single-celled creatures living deep beneath the seafloor have provided clues about how to find life on Mars.

Huge bacteria-eating viruses close gap between life and non-life
Bacterial viruses, called bacteriophages, are simple genetic machines, relying on their bacterial hosts to replicate and spread.

Me, me, me! How narcissism changes throughout life
New research from Michigan State University conducted the longest study on narcissism to date, revealing how it changes over time.

Life on Mars?
Researchers from Hungary have discovered embedded organic material in a Martian meteorite found in the late 1970s.

Early-life exposure to microbiota restricts colon cancer later in life, study finds
Exposure to microbiota, or microorganisms such as bacteria, in the early stages of life plays a crucial role in establishing optimal conditions in the intestine that inhibit the development of colon cancer in adulthood, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

Recent advances in spina bifida care extend life and improve quality of life
Spina bifida (myelomeningocele) is the most common, permanently disabling birth defect compatible with life.

Models of life
Friedrich Simmel und Aurore Dupin, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have for the first time created artificial cell assemblies that can communicate with each other.

Read More: Life News and Life Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.