New treatment to protect people with peanut allergies ready for FDA review

November 18, 2018

SEATTLE (November 18, 2018, 1:45 pm PDT) - The final research results for a new treatment for protection against accidental exposure to peanut was presented today at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting and published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The results show it is possible for some people with peanut allergy to protect themselves from accidental ingestion by building up their tolerance to peanut over time.

"We're excited about the potential to help children and adolescents with peanut allergy protect themselves against accidentally eating a food with peanut in it," says allergist Stephen Tilles, MD, ACAAI past president, study co-author, and consulting advisor for Aimmune Therapeutics. "Our hope when we started the study was that by treating patients with the equivalent of one peanut per day, many would tolerate as much as two peanuts. We were pleased to find that two thirds of the people in the study were able to tolerate the equivalent of two peanuts per day after nine to 12 months of treatment, and half the patients tolerated the equivalent of four peanuts."

Study participants ranged in age from 4 to 55 years, most were 4 to 17, and all had peanut allergy. One third of the participants were given a placebo, while the remaining two-thirds were given peanut protein powder in increasing amounts until reaching the "maintenance dose" - the dose they stayed on for the remainder of the study. The maintenance does was the equivalent of one peanut daily.

"This is not a quick fix, and it doesn't mean people with peanut allergy will be able to eat peanuts whenever they want," says allergist Jay Lieberman, MD, vice chair of the ACAAI Food Allergy Committee and study co-author. "But it is definitely a breakthrough. The hope would be to have a treatment available in the second half of 2019. If that happens, people who receive and are able to tolerate this treatment should be protected from accidental exposures."

All those in the study received peanut protein as part of an oral food challenge (OFC). A person in an OFC is given a very small dose of the food by mouth under the supervision of a board-certified allergist to test for a severe reaction. OFCs are considered the gold standard for testing food allergy.

"Reactions from the oral challenges at the end of the study were much milder than prior to treatment," says Dr. Tilles. "On average, the participants were able to tolerate a 100-fold higher dose of peanut at the end of the study than they did at the beginning. In addition, the symptoms caused by the 100-fold higher dose at the end of study were milder than the symptoms on the lower dose at the beginning of the study."

Facts about this pivotal study: There are currently no approved treatment options for peanut allergy. If this treatment is approved by the FDA, it will be available by prescription, and people with peanut allergy will need to remain on it to stay protected against accidental consumption. Once someone stops the treatment, there is no longer a protective effect.
-end-
Abstract Title: Age-Related Findings from the Peanut Allergy Oral Immunotherapy Study of AR101 for Desensitization (PALISADE) Study.

Author: Stephen A. Tilles, MD, ACAAI past president, Jay Lieberman, MD, vice chair, ACAAI Food Allergy Committee

New England Journal of Medicine Article Title: AR101 Oral Immunotherapy for Peanut Allergy

For more information about food allergies and to locate an allergist in your area, visit AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. The ACAAI Annual Meeting is November 15-19, 2018 at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. For more news and research from the ACAAI Scientific Meeting, go to our newsroom - and follow the conversation on Twitter #ACAAI18.

About ACAAI

ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 6,000 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. Join us on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Related Peanut Allergy Articles from Brightsurf:

More healthful milk chocolate by adding peanut, coffee waste
Milk chocolate is a consumer favorite worldwide, prized for its sweet flavor and creamy texture.

Only a third of pediatricians fully follow guidelines on peanut allergy prevention
While 93 percent of U.S. pediatricians surveyed were aware of the national guidelines on peanut allergy prevention in infants, only 30 percent were fully implementing the recommended practices and 64 percent reported partial implementation, according to the study published in JAMA Network Open.

Severe peanut allergy may be a 'gut reaction'
A new study of 19 people who suffer from peanut allergy found an abundance of allergy-causing immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies in the gut, providing valuable insights into the mechanisms of severe allergies to peanuts and other foods, which together affect as much as 6% of the US population.

Forty percent of people with peanut allergies can eat tree nuts but choose not to
New study showed that nearly 90% of people with peanut allergy could potentially tolerate almonds, but 33% of that group preferred strict avoidance due to fear of an allergic reaction.

Multi-omics approach offers new insights into peanut allergy severity
Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified novel genes associated with the severity of peanut allergy, as well as ways in which these genes interact with other genes during allergic reactions.

Antibody injection stops peanut allergy for 2 to 6 weeks, Stanford-led study shows
One injection of an antibody treatment let people with severe peanut allergies eat a nut's worth of peanut protein two weeks later, a small, Stanford-led pilot study showed.

Allergy shots may be an effective treatment for pediatric pollen food allergy syndrome
A new study being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in Houston shows allergy shots (subcutaneous immunotherapy) can be effective in reducing PFAS symptoms for pediatric patients.

Few people with peanut allergy tolerate peanut after stopping oral immunotherapy
Studies have shown that peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) -- ingesting small, controlled amounts of peanut protein -- can desensitize adults and children and prevent allergic reactions, but the optimal duration and dose is unknown.

New peanut allergy treatment shows effectiveness and safety
Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) trial participants tolerated between 10 and 20 times more peanut protein than it would take for someone to get sick.

Researchers crack the peanut genome
Working to understand the genetics of peanut disease resistance and yield, researchers led by scientists at the University of Georgia have uncovered the peanut's unlikely and complicated evolution.

Read More: Peanut Allergy News and Peanut Allergy Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.