Industry honors plastics recycling and reactive polymer processing expert at NJIT

November 19, 2010

Marino Xanthos, PhD, a professor in NJIT's Otto H. York Department of Chemical, Biological and Pharmaceutical Engineering was awarded the 2010 Heinz List Award at the annual meeting of the Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE) in Orlando. His colleagues honored him for outstanding achievements in polymerization reactions and polymer devolatilization technologies. For more information about the process, please visit http://www.list.ch/.

Sponsored by LIST USA, Charlotte, NC, an extrusion and polymer reaction machinery manufacturer, the Heinz List Award, is given to an individual who has demonstrated unique vision and innovation in the field of polymer processing technology.

Xanthos, an SPE Fellow, was applauded for his work which has helped polymer engineering advance as an academic discipline. In a career spanning more than 40 years, Xanthos holds five U.S. patents and has published more than 250 journal articles and conference publications.

At NJIT, Xanthos also has served as director of research of the Polymer Processing Institute (PPI) where he supervised researchers who developed new applications for recycled plastics based on reactive polymer processing

Xanthos received his doctoral and master's degrees from the department of chemical engineering and applied chemistry at University of Toronto. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Thessaloniki, Greece. Xanthos holds in addition to his U.S. patents, two Canadian patents and has been a regular technical consultant since 1987 to companies such as Arkema (France), Colgate-Palmolive, Roche Diagnostics, AT&T, Shell Chemical Co. and Cytec.
-end-
NJIT, New Jersey's science and technology university,enrolls more than 8,900 students pursuing bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in 120 programs. The university consists of six colleges: Newark College of Engineering, College of Architecture and Design, College of Science and Liberal Arts, School of Management, College of Computing Sciences and Albert Dorman Honors College. U.S. News & World Report's 2009 Annual Guide to America's Best Colleges ranked NJIT in the top tier of national research universities. NJIT is internationally recognized for being at the edge in knowledge in architecture, applied mathematics, wireless communications and networking, solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning. Many courses and certificate programs, as well as graduate degrees, are available online through the Office of Continuing Professional Education.

New Jersey Institute of Technology

Related Chemical Engineering Articles from Brightsurf:

Strain engineering of 2D semiconductor and graphene
Strain engineering can significantly manipulate the two-dimensional (2D) materials' electronic and optical properties, which endow it the potential applications in optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19
Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity

Next frontier in bacterial engineering
A new technique overcomes a serious hurdle in the field of bacterial design and engineering.

COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.

Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy.

Scientists use molecular tethers, chemical 'light sabers' for tissue engineering
Researchers at the University of Washington unveiled a new strategy to keep proteins intact and functional in synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering.

Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size.

Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.

A new way to do metabolic engineering
University of Illinois researchers have created a novel metabolic engineering method that combines transcriptional activation, transcriptional interference, and gene deletion, and executes them simultaneously, making the process faster and easier.

Read More: Chemical Engineering News and Chemical Engineering Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.