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Treatment for sickle cell disease may help protect patients' kidney function

November 19, 2015

Highlights
  • After 6 months of treatment with hydroxyurea, sickle cell disease patients' kidney function, as measured by the urinary albumin/creatine ratio, improved significantly.

Washington, DC (November 19, 2015) -- A drug used to treat sickle cell disease may provide an added benefit of protecting patients' kidney function, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN).

Sickle cell disease, a blood disorder, can impact the function of the kidneys, and the earliest sign of kidney damage in affected patients is albuminuria, or the presence of albumin in the urine.

Hydroxyurea (HU), which makes red blood cells more flexible, is one of the cornerstones of sickle cell disease treatment, but its effects on kidney function are unclear. To investigate, Pablo Bartolucci, MD, PhD, Vincent Audard, MD, PhD (Université Paris-Est Créteil, in France), and their colleagues studied 58 adults with sickle cell disease who were starting HU therapy. After 6 months of treatment, patients' kidney function, as measured by the urinary albumin/creatine ratio, improved significantly.

"The findings offer further evidence, albeit not yet definitive, of a potential renal benefit of HU, and should strengthen arguments favoring its use in sickle cell disease for other indications and encouraging patient adherence to this drug," said Dr. Bartolucci. "Our preliminary results require additional larger, prospective, randomized, controlled trials to clearly demonstrate the positive effect of HU to reduce albuminuria levels and delay chronic kidney disease progression," added Dr. Audard.
-end-
Study authors include Anoosha Habibi, MD, Thomas Stehlé, MD, Gaetana Di Liberto, PhD, Marie Georgine Rakotoson, PhD, Justine Gellen-Dautremer, MD, Sylvain Loric, MD, PhD, Stéphane Moutereau, MD, PhD, Dil Sahali, MD, PhD, Orianne Wagner-Ballon, MD, PhD, Philippe Remy, MD, Philippe Lang, MD, PhD, Philippe Grimbert, MD, PhD, Étienne Audureau, MD, PhD, Bertrand Godeau, MD, PhD, and Frédéric Galacteros, MD, PhD.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled "Six Months of Hydroxyurea Reduces Albuminuria in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease," will appear online at http://jasn.asnjournals.org/ on November 19, 2015.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with nearly 16,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.

American Society of Nephrology

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