Tighter blood pressure control may save more than 100,000 lives each year in the US

November 19, 2016

Highlights Chicago, IL (November 19, 2016) -- Intensive systolic blood pressure (SBP) lowering may prevent more than 100,000 deaths in the United States each year, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15¬-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL.

The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) trial found that intensive systolic SBP lowering (?120 mm Hg) prolonged life compared with standard SBP lowering (?140 mm Hg) in adults aged ?50 years who were at high risk for cardiovascular disease but who did not have diabetes or a history of stroke.

When Tisha Joerla Tan, MD (Loyola University Medical Center) and her colleagues applied the study's findings to similar individuals in the general US population, an estimated 18.1 million US adults met SPRINT criteria and intensive SBP lowering was projected to prevent approximately 107,500 deaths per year. "Our analyses also showed that more than 4 million adults with stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease meet SPRINT criteria, and intensive SBP lowering was projected to prevent 32,800 deaths per year in this group," said Dr. Tan.
-end-
Study: "Intensive Blood Pressure Lowering Will Prevent Over 100,000 Deaths Annually" (Abstract 2229)

ASN Kidney Week 2016, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2016 will take place November 15-20, 2016 in Chicago, IL.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has nearly 16,000 members representing 112 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.asn-online.org or contact us at (202) 640-4660.

American Society of Nephrology

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