Nav: Home

Study finds 45 minutes of patient education improves chronic disease management

November 19, 2018

CHICAGO--November 19, 2018--Just 45 minutes of patient education can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diseases, according to a study in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

The study, titled The Other 45, assigned 47 patients who were diagnosed with a chronic disease, like hypertension, COPD, or diabetes, to visit with a second-year medical student for 45 minutes after seeing their physician. That one-on-one session measurably improved patients' attitudes and abilities in self-managing their care.

Patients also had subsequent follow-up appointments with the students at three weeks and three months after their initial session, and were assessed on a 40 -point questionnaire. Results at both points demonstrated consistent improvement in patients' willingness and capacity to be able to self-manage their care.

"Patients reported a greater understanding of their chronic disease and feeling better equipped to manage their health," said Alexis Stoner, PhD, director of Preventive Medicine and Public Health at Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine and lead author of this study. "This is encouraging because these diseases typically require patients to take on a lot of responsibility in their care, often through changes in lifestyle."

The Other 45 directed its efforts to an underserved community, noting the population's higher rates of chronic disease coupled with less exposure and access to accurate health information. By the end of the third visit, patients reported increased confidence in navigating the healthcare system, self-monitoring and insight, and skill and technique acquisition. They also reported decreased emotional distress.

Prior research has demonstrated that educating patients and getting them engaged in their own care significantly improves outcomes and reduces unnecessary medical costs.

Study authors acknowledge that most hospitals and physician practices don't have access to medical students who can devote time to patient education. However, they note that nurses, physician assistants or health lifestyle advisors could fill the role.

"As physicians are increasingly held to the standards of value-based care, building in time and staff for patient education will prove critical to demonstrating success," said Stoner.
-end-
About the JAOA

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association (JAOA) is the official scientific publication of the American Osteopathic Association. Edited by Robert Orenstein, DO, it is the premier scholarly peer-reviewed publication of the osteopathic medical profession. The JAOA's mission is to advance medicine through the publication of peer-reviewed osteopathic research.

Media Contact

Jeff Brennan, Media Relations Manager
312-202-8161
jbrennan@osteopathic.org

American Osteopathic Association

Related Chronic Disease Articles:

Combating chronic kidney disease with exercise
A University of Delaware research team is combating chronic kidney disease (CKD) with exercise.
Accentuate the positive to reduce risk of chronic disease
People who experience not just positive emotions but a diversity of positive emotions appear to have lower levels of systemic inflammation, which may reduce their risk for chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
Experts argue that obesity is a chronic, relapsing, progressive disease
In a new article, World Obesity Federation experts consider the argument for obesity as a chronic relapsing disease process.
Maternal chronic disease linked to higher rates of congenital heart disease in babies
Pregnant women with congenital heart defects or type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of giving birth to babies with severe congenital heart disease and should be monitored closely in the prenatal period, according to a study published in CMAJ.
Chronic kidney disease may cause diabetes
A team from the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) has discovered a novel link between chronic kidney disease and diabetes.
Discovery of biomarkers for the prognosis of chronic kidney disease
Currently, there is no effective method to predict the prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients.
Diabetes more frequent in children with chronic rheumatic disease
Diabetes more frequent in children with chronic rheumatic disease
Are new therapies for Crohn's disease and chronic pancreatitis on the horizon?
Two new studies from CMGH offer insight into new interventions for Crohn's disease and chronic pancreatitis.
Does text messaging help with medication adherence in chronic disease?
Medication adherence in chronic disease is poor. Can telephone text messaging help with adherence?
Identification of a driver of fibrosis in chronic kidney disease
A new study in the inaugural issue of JCI Insight identifies the Wnt pathway modulator Dickkopf-3 as a driver of kidney fibrosis.

Related Chronic Disease Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".