Importance of mitochondrial-related genes in dilated cardiomyopathy

November 19, 2020

In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0588, Yukuan Chen, Xiaohui Wu, Danchun Hu and Wei Wang, from the Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China and Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China consider the importance of mitochondrial-related genes in dilated cardiomyopathy.

The authors designed this study to identify potential key protein interaction networks, genes, and correlated pathways in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) via bioinformatics methods.

A GSE3586 microarray dataset was selected, consisting of 15 dilated cardiomyopathic heart biopsy samples and 13 nonfailing heart biopsy samples. Initially, the GSE3586 dataset was downloaded and was analyzed with the limma package to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A total of 172 DEGs consisting of 162 upregulated genes and ten downregulated genes in DCM were selected by the criterion of adjusted Pvalues less than 0.01 and the log2-fold change of 0.6 or greater.

Gene Ontology functional enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis were performed to view the biological processes, cellular components, molecular function, and KEGG pathways of the DEGs. Protein-protein interactions were constructed, and the hub protein modules were identified. The key genes DLD, UQCRC2, DLAT, SUCLA2, ATP5A1, PRDX3, FH, SDHD, and NDUFV1, were then selected; these are involved in a wide range of biological activities, such as the citrate cycle, oxidation-reduction processes and cellular respiration, and energy derivation by oxidation of organic compounds in mitochondria.

The authors found that currently there are no related gene-targeting drugs after exploring the predicted interactions between key genes and drugs, and transcription factors, providing greater understanding of the pathogenesis and underlying molecular mechanisms in DCM.
-end-
Citation information: Importance of Mitochondrial-Related Genes in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Based on Bioinformatics Analysis, Yukuan Chen, Xiaohui Wu, Danchun Hu and Wei Wang, Cardiovasc. Innov. App., 2020, https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0588

Keywords: dilated cardiomyopathy; bioinformatics analysis; differentially expressed genes

CVIA is available on the IngentaConnect platform and at Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications. Submissions may be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts. There are no author submission or article processing fees. CVIA is indexed in the EMBASE, ESCI, OCLC, Primo Central (Ex Libris), Sherpa Romeo, NISC (National Information Services Corporation), DOAJ and Index Copernicus Databases. Follow CVIA on Twitter @CVIA_Journal; or Facebook.

Compuscript Ltd

Related Protein Articles from Brightsurf:

The protein dress of a neuron
New method marks proteins and reveals the receptors in which neurons are dressed

Memory protein
When UC Santa Barbara materials scientist Omar Saleh and graduate student Ian Morgan sought to understand the mechanical behaviors of disordered proteins in the lab, they expected that after being stretched, one particular model protein would snap back instantaneously, like a rubber band.

Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, linked to lower risk of death
Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, are associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, finds an analysis of the latest evidence published by The BMJ today.

A new understanding of protein movement
A team of UD engineers has uncovered the role of surface diffusion in protein transport, which could aid biopharmaceutical processing.

A new biotinylation enzyme for analyzing protein-protein interactions
Proteins play roles by interacting with various other proteins. Therefore, interaction analysis is an indispensable technique for studying the function of proteins.

Substituting the next-best protein
Children born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a mutation in the X-chromosome gene that would normally code for dystrophin, a protein that provides structural integrity to skeletal muscles.

A direct protein-to-protein binding couples cell survival to cell proliferation
The regulators of apoptosis watch over cell replication and the decision to enter the cell cycle.

A protein that controls inflammation
A study by the research team of Prof. Geert van Loo (VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) has unraveled a critical molecular mechanism behind autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriasis.

Resurrecting ancient protein partners reveals origin of protein regulation
After reconstructing the ancient forms of two cellular proteins, scientists discovered the earliest known instance of a complex form of protein regulation.

Sensing protein wellbeing
The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health.

Read More: Protein News and Protein Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.