Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility wins the High Performance Computing Challenge

November 20, 2008

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has been named a winner of the annual High Performance Computing (HPC) Challenge Award at the SuperComputing 08 Conference in Austin, Texas.

"It is an honor to be recognized as a winner of the HPC Challenge," said Pete Beckman, director of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF). "This award proves that energy efficiency and computational power are not mutually exclusive. We can still push performance boundaries and deliver stellar results while using a fraction of the power typically needed for supercomputers."

Argonne was the clear winner in two of the four categories awarded in the HPC Challenge best performance benchmark competition, which were run using 32 racks of Argonne's Blue Gene/P.

Argonne's score of 103 GUPS (Giga Updates per Second) for Global RandomAccess was almost three times faster than last year's winner. Global RandomAccess measures memory performance and stresses traditional system bottlenecks that are directly correlated to application performance.

Argonne also won the Global FFT category, which measures the floating point rate of execution of double precision complex one-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform, which is used to efficiently transform one function into another scoring 5080 Gflops.

The HPC Challenge is a suite of tests that examine the performance of high-end architectures using kernels with memory access patterns considered more challenging than those of the High Performance LINPACK benchmark used in determining the Top500 list and is sponsored by DARPA High Productivity Computing Systems Program and IDC. The goal of the competition is to focus the HPC community's attention on developing a broad set of HPC hardware and HPC software capabilities that are necessary to productively use HPC systems.

"The HPC Challenge provides an important benchmark for accelerating petascale computation for breakthrough science and engineering and will be an important measure as we begin to work towards the exascale," Beckman added.

The ALCF is home to DOE's Intrepid, a 40-rack IBM Blue Gene/P capable of a peak-performance of 557 Teraflops (557 trillion calculations per second). The Blue Gene/P features a low-power system-on-a-chip architecture and a scalable communications fabric that enables science applications to spend more time computing and less time moving data between CPUs, both reducing power demands and lowing operating costs.

As part of DOE's Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment program, the ALCF provides in-depth expertise and assistance in using ALCF systems and optimizing applications to help researchers from all different scientific disciplines to scale successfully to an unprecedented number of processors to solve some of our nation's most pressing technology challenges.

The ALCF is a leadership-class computing facility that enables the research and development community to make innovative and high-impact science and engineering breakthroughs. Through the ALCF, researchers conduct computationally intensive projects on the largest possible scale. Argonne operates the ALCF for the DOE Office of Science as part of the larger DOE Leadership Computing Facility strategy. DOE leads the world in providing the most capable civilian supercomputers for science.
-end-
Argonne National Laboratory seeks solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation's first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America 's scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science.

DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Related Leadership Articles from Brightsurf:

Women in leadership positions face more sexual harassment
Power in the workplace does not stop women's exposure to sexual harassment.

Collective leadership groups maintain cohesion and act decisively
Members of collective leadership groups can maintain cohesion and act decisively when faced with a crisis, in spite of lacking the formal authority to do so, according to new research from Cass Business School.

Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish
Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows.

Rice study assesses college leadership training programs
A new study from psychologists at Rice University found they teach students about leadership, but additional measures are needed to evaluate how they impact students' real-life leadership skills.

These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership
Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees.

Preventing toxic work environments through ethical leadership
Recently published research from SDSU management professor, Dr. Gabi Eissa and University of Wisconsin -- Eau Claire management professor, Dr.

Women, your inner circle may be key to gaining leadership roles
According to a new Notre Dame study, women who communicate regularly with a female-dominated inner circle are more likely to attain high-ranking leadership positions.

Feminine leadership traits: Nice but expendable frills?
The first study to examine tradeoffs in masculine versus feminine leadership traits reveals that stereotypically feminine traits -- like being tolerant and cooperative -- are viewed as desirable but ultimately superfluous add-ons.

Leadership and adaptive reserve are not associated with blood pressure control
Primary care leadership and practice resilience can strengthen organizational culture.

Values and gender shape young adults' entrepreneurial and leadership
Young adults who are driven by extrinsic rewards and money and less by a sense of security are more likely to want to become entrepreneurs and leaders, according to a recent study.

Read More: Leadership News and Leadership Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.