AGI announces winners of Earth Science Week 2005 contests

November 21, 2005

Alexandria, VA - The American Geological Institute (AGI) is proud to announce the 2005 Earth Science Week contest winners. The contests encourage the public to participate in this annual celebration, which recognizes the importance of the earth sciences in our lives. Selecting from among more than 500 entries, AGI is pleased to name the three winners:

All submissions were judged by a panel of geoscientists on creativity, incorporation of the topic, and other relevant factors. Each winner receives $300 cash. Winning entries and other finalists are posted on the Earth Science Week Web site at www.earthsciweek.org.

The contests represent an important part of Earth Science Week, which took place October 9-15, 2005. With active participation in all 50 states and around the world, Earth Science Week provides a focal point for the Earth science community's outreach to the public. The celebration was officially proclaimed by more than 20 state governors and was recognized by President George W. Bush. The theme for Earth Science Week 2005, "Geoscientists Explore the Earth," shone a spotlight on the many exciting and rewarding career opportunities available in the geosciences.
-end-
AGI, in collaboration with its member societies and Earth Science Week sponsors, is now preparing for Earth Science Week 2006. To learn how you can participate, visit the Earth Science Week Web site, www.earthsciweek.org, or contact Cindy Martinez, Earth Science Week Manager, at (703) 379-2480 x227 or cmm@agiweb.org.

The American Geological Institute is a nonprofit federation of 44 scientific and professional associations that represent more than 120,000 geologists, geophysicists, and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in our profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources and interaction with the environment. More information about AGI can be found at http://www.agiweb.org.

American Geosciences Institute

Related Earth Articles from Brightsurf:

The craters on Earth
A two-volume atlas presents and explains the impact sites of meteorites and asteroids worldwide

A new way of looking at the Earth's interior
Current understanding is that the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is relatively homogeneous.

Some planets may be better for life than Earth
Researchers have identified two dozen planets outside our solar system that may have conditions more suitable for life than our own.

Earth may always have been wet
The Earth is the only planet known to have liquid water on its surface, a fundamental characteristic when it comes to explaining the emergence of life.

Probing materials at deep-Earth conditions to decipher Earth's evolutionary tale
Scientists have developed a way to study liquid silicates at the extreme conditions found in the core-mantle boundary.

What is the origin of water on Earth?
Led by Cédric Gillmann -- Université libre de Bruxelles, ULB, funded by the EoS project ET-HoME, a team of researchers demonstrate that the water we are now enjoying on Earth has been there since its formation.

How and when was carbon distributed in the Earth?
A magma ocean existing during the core formation is thought to have been highly depleted in carbon due to its high-siderophile (iron loving) behavior.

Deep-earth diamonds reveal primordial rock source in Earth's mantle
An analysis of helium isotopes locked inside 'super-deep' diamonds hundreds of kilometers below Earth's surface suggests that vast reservoirs of molten primordial source rock, perhaps nearly as old as the Earth, are present.

Why is the Earth's F/Cl ratio not chondritic?
It is generally believed that terrestrial planets were made from chondrites.

Building blocks of the Earth
Geologists from the Universities of Cologne and Bonn gain new insights regarding the Earth's composition by analysing meteorites.

Read More: Earth News and Earth Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.