Computer-navigated total knee replacement

November 21, 2012

Rosemont, Ill. - For many years, the use of computer-assisted navigation has been touted as improving the positioning, sizing and alignment of replacement knee joints, resulting in greater durability of joints and overall improvement in patient movement. However, new research published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) found no difference in knee function, alignment or durability/survivorship between joints positioned and completed with the help of computer navigation, and those replaced with conventional total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures.

Researchers in Korea compared the results of 520 patients with osteoarthritis who underwent computer-navigated TKA for one knee and conventional TKA for the other knee. Patients included 452 women (904 knees) and 68 men (136 knees). Patients were assessed before surgery, and then at three months and one year following surgery, and annually thereafter, for 10 to 12 years (mean assessment duration: 10.8 years). Patients were assessed clinically using the Knee Society rating system and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and. radiographically using X-rays or CT scans.

No statistically significant differences were noted between the computer-navigated and traditional procedure scores pertaining to knee function, pain, knee motion and activity, according to the study. In addition, the Knee Society and WOMAC scores were comparable for both procedures.

"Our mid-term follow-up data demonstrated no difference in clinical function or alignment and survivorship of the components between the knees that underwent computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty and those that underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty," said Young-Hoo Kim, MD, The Joint Replacement Center, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine in Seoul, Korea.

Key Findings: "The effect of computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty compared with conventional total knee arthroplasty on long-term implant survival remains unproven," said Dr. Kim.
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About JBJS

November 21st Full JBJS Table of Contents


Computer-Navigation versus Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty. Prospective Randomized Trial

Risk of Sciatic Nerve Traction Injury During Hip Arthroscopy - Is it the Amount or Duration? An Intra-Operative Nerve Monitoring Study

Functional Impact of Tibial Malrotation Following Intramedullary Nailing of Tibial Shaft Fractures

Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Block Anesthesia for Shoulder Arthroscopy: A Prospective Study of 1,319 Patients

Risk Factors of Wound Complications after Ankle Fracture Surgery

Long-term Follow-up of Shoulder Hemiarthroplastay for Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis

Do Traction Views of Distal Radial Fractures Influence Fracture Characterization and Treatment?

Improved Healing of Large Segmental Defects in the Rat Femur by Reverse Dynamization in the Presence of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

Outcomes of Operative Treatment of Unstable Ankle Fracture-Comparison Between Metallic and Biodegradable Implants

Prognostic Factors for Bacterial Cultures Positive with Propionibacterium Acnes and Other Organisms in a Large Series of Cases of Shoulder Arthroplasty Revised for Stiffness, Pain or Loosening

The Effect of Collagen Nerve Conduits Filled with Collagen-GAG Matrix on Peripheral Motor Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model

A Nation in Motion

More than one in four Americans have bone or joint health problems, making them the greatest cause of lost work days in the U.S. When orthopaedic surgeons restore mobility and reduce pain, they help people get back to work and to independent, productive lives. Orthopaedic surgeons provide the best value in American medicine in both human and economic terms and access to high-quality orthopaedic care keeps this "Nation in Motion." To learn more, to read hundreds of patient stories or to submit your own story, visit anationinmotion.org.

More information on knee replacement can be found at orthoinfo.org

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

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