Organizations collaborate to support research on arthritis and aging

November 21, 2012

The Arthritis National Research Foundation (ANRF) in Long Beach, CA and the American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR) in New York, NY proudly announce their collaboration to fund an Arthritis and Aging Research Grant. The Arthritis and Aging Research Grant provides up to $100,000 for one year to junior faculty studying the role of aging in the development of arthritis. A second year of funding may be available if significant progress is demonstrated. The grant application process is now open for 2013.

"This collaboration with the American Federation for Aging Research enables us to pool our resources and relationships within the scientific community to expand our outreach and opportunity for new knowledge in the field," said Arthritis National Research Foundation executive director Helene Belisle.

The Arthritis National Research Foundation (ANRF) is the charity that funds research to cure arthritis.

"We are pleased to be collaborating with the Arthritis National Research Foundation. Understanding the connections between the fundamental mechanisms of aging and arthritis will move us closer to effective treatments and cures for arthritis," said Stephanie Lederman, executive director of AFAR.

Aging is a major risk factor for some forms of arthritis. Osteoarthritis for example, is strongly linked to aging but the mechanisms for this link are incompletely understood. With this grant, AFAR and ANRF aim to support new research in this still underexplored area. "We are enthusiastic about this partnership; it is a perfect fit for both organizations," Belisle added.

Applications for the research program must be submitted online, at the ANRF website, no later than January 18, 2013, at 5:00 pm PST. The grant period is from June 1, 2013 to May 31, 2014.

"Our goal is to cure arthritis for people suffering worldwide," added Belisle. "With our aging population, this disease will be increasingly prevalent. Research funded by the collaboration of ANRF and AFAR could uncover new information to help find a cure."
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For more information about the Arthritis and Aging Research Grant please contact ANRF Executive Director, Helene Belisle at 800-588-2873 or AFAR Director of Grant Programs, Odette van der Willik at 212-703-9977. To register and initiate the application process please visit http://CureArthritis.org/research-grant-application/.

About AFAR

Founded in 1981, AFAR has championed the cause and supported the funding of science in healthier aging and age-related medicine. To address the shortage of physicians and researchers dedicated to the science of healthier aging, AFAR funds physicians and scientists probing the fundamental mechanisms of aging, as well as specific diseases associated with aging populations.

About ANRF

Since 1970, the Arthritis National Research Foundation, a tax deductible charity based in Long Beach, CA, has supported outstanding young scientists who have become innovators and leaders in the field of rheumatic disease research, autoimmunity and inflammation. From the discovery of TNF to genes involved in lupus, their research accomplishments have made an impact. ANRF's approach is to fund the next generation of researchers to encourage their continued commitment to research in arthritis and related diseases. Contact:

Derek Belisle
Arthritis National Research Foundation
derek@curearthritis.org


American Federation for Aging Research

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