'Wonder of Nanotechnology' details research enabling nanoscale optoelectronic devices

November 21, 2013

BELLINGHAM, Washington, USA - Nanotechnology research has progressed into quantum-level systems where electrons, photonics, and even thermal properties can be engineered, enabling new structures and materials with which to create ever-shrinking, ever-faster electronics. The Wonder of Nanotechnology: Quantum Optoelectronic Devices and Applications, edited by Manijeh Razeghi and Nobel Laureates Leo Esaki and Klaus von Klitzing, focuses on the application of nanotechnology to modern semiconductor optoelectronic devices The book is published by SPIE, the international society of optics and photonics.

The volume is a compilation of research papers from the International Conference on Infrared Optoelectronics at Northwestern University's Center for Quantum Devices in September 2012, developed into chapters representing state-of-the-art research in infrared materials and devices.

"Advances in material science at the nanometer scale are opening new doors in the area of optics and electronics. The ability to manipulate atoms and photons, and fabricate new material structures offers opportunities to realize new emitters, detectors, optics, ever-shrinking electronics, and integration of optics and electronics," writes Nibir Dhar, program manager with Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), in an essay in the book. "Imaging technology has the opportunity to leverage these developments to produce new products for military, industrial, medical, security, and other consumer applications."

The editors of Wonder of Nanotechnology are: "The chapters in this book bear witness to how far we have come since the invention of manmade semiconductor superlattices in 1969," Esaki writes in the book's foreword. "I look back with wonder at all of the exciting developments of the last 44 years and can only imagine where the future will take this technology and what exciting discoveries await."

The book's editors also address the inspiration of nature in studying nanoscale structures, and how the human ability to control material composition on the nanometer scale is what allows us to achieve technological goals transcending the properties of naturally occurring materials.

"The wings of a butterfly, the feather of a peacock, the sheen of a pearl -- all of these are examples of nature's photonic crystals: nanostructured arrangements of atoms that capture and recast the colors of the rainbow with iridescent beauty," von Klitzing writes in the book's preface. "As our tools to manipulate matter reach ever smaller length scales, we, too, are able to join in the game of discovery in the nano-world -- a game that nature has long since mastered."

Notable chapters include:
-end-
SPIE is the international society for optics and photonics, a not-for-profit organization founded in 1955 to advance light-based technologies. The Society serves nearly 235,000 constituents from approximately 155 countries, offering conferences, continuing education, books, journals, and a digital library in support of interdisciplinary information exchange, professional networking, and patent precedent. SPIE provided over $3.2 million in support of education and outreach programs in 2012.

SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Related Nanotechnology Articles from Brightsurf:

Hiring antibodies as nanotechnology builders
Researchers at the University of Rome Tor Vergata recruit antibodies as molecular builders to assemble nanoscale structures made of synthetic DNA.

Nanotechnology delivers hepatitis B vaccine
X-ray imaging shows that nanostructured silica acts as a protective vehicle to deliver intact antigen to the intestine so that it can trigger an immune response.

Want in on nanotechnology? Capitalize on collaborative environments
Patent law experts demonstrate that private-public partnerships lead to promising innovation output measured in patents.

Nanotechnology makes it possible for mice to see in infrared
Mice with vision enhanced by nanotechnology were able to see infrared light as well as visible light, reports a study published Feb.

Healing kidneys with nanotechnology
In new research appearing in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, Hao Yan and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and in China describe a new method for treating and preventing Acute Kidney Injury.

A treasure trove for nanotechnology experts
A team from EPFL and NCCR Marvel has identified more than 1,000 materials with a particularly interesting 2-D structure.

Nanotechnology could redefine oral surgery
A trip to the dentist or orthodontist usually instills a sense of dread in most patients, and that's before the exam even begins.

MEDLINE indexes Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology
Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, an important journal published by Benthm Science, is accepted to be included in MEDLINE.

Nanotechnology and nanopore sequencing
DNA is the hereditary material in our cells and contains the instructions for them to live, behave, grow, and develop.

Nanotechnology: Lighting up ultrathin films
Based on a study of the optical properties of novel ultrathin semiconductors, researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have developed a method for rapid and efficient characterization of these materials.

Read More: Nanotechnology News and Nanotechnology Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.